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authorChris Johns <chrisj@rtems.org>2016-01-23 14:24:00 +1100
committerAmar Takhar <verm@darkbeer.org>2016-05-02 20:51:25 -0400
commitbcfdcef840c3b8000cd78de707654b6fabe42c5a (patch)
tree5bb650ea5398c0caec4628cb984f5071f91a53a5 /shell
parentfabe6d020fef5bdefe8519c8a1b36c8ef68c6e97 (diff)
downloadrtems-docs-bcfdcef840c3b8000cd78de707654b6fabe42c5a.tar.bz2
Clean up.
Diffstat (limited to 'shell')
-rw-r--r--shell/network_commands.rst478
1 files changed, 249 insertions, 229 deletions
diff --git a/shell/network_commands.rst b/shell/network_commands.rst
index 3fd39f5..ece1fca 100644
--- a/shell/network_commands.rst
+++ b/shell/network_commands.rst
@@ -1,3 +1,7 @@
+.. COMMENT: COPYRIGHT (c) 1988-2008.
+.. COMMENT: On-Line Applications Research Corporation (OAR).
+.. COMMENT: All rights reserved.
+
Network Commands
################
@@ -6,37 +10,38 @@ Introduction
The RTEMS shell has the following network commands:
-- ``netstats`` - obtain network statistics
+- netstats_ - obtain network statistics
-- ``ifconfig`` - configure a network interface
+- ifconfig_ - configure a network interface
-- ``route`` - show or manipulate the IP routing table
+- route_ - show or manipulate the IP routing table
-- ``ping`` - ping a host or IP address
+- ping_ - ping a host or IP address
Commands
========
-This section details the Network Commands available. A
-subsection is dedicated to each of the commands and
-describes the behavior and configuration of that
+This section details the Network Commands available. A subsection is dedicated
+to each of the commands and describes the behavior and configuration of that
command as well as providing an example usage.
+.. _netstats:
+
netstats - obtain network statistics
------------------------------------
.. index:: netstats
**SYNOPSYS:**
-.. code:: c
+.. code:: shell
- netstats \[-Aimfpcut]
+ netstats [-Aimfpcut]
**DESCRIPTION:**
This command is used to display various types of network statistics. The
-information displayed can be specified using command line arguments in
-various combinations. The arguments are interpreted as follows:
+information displayed can be specified using command line arguments in various
+combinations. The arguments are interpreted as follows:
*-A*
print All statistics
@@ -72,11 +77,10 @@ NONE
**EXAMPLES:**
-The following is an example of how to use ``netstats``:
+The following is an example of using the ``netstats`` command to print the IP
+routing table:
-The following is an example of using the ``netstats``
-command to print the IP routing table:
-.. code:: c
+.. code:: shell
[/] $ netstats -i
Destination Gateway/Mask/Hw Flags Refs Use Expire Interface
@@ -86,12 +90,13 @@ command to print the IP routing table:
192.168.1.51 00:1D:7E:0C:D0:7C UHL 0 840 1202 eth1
192.168.1.151 00:1C:23:B2:0F:BB UHL 1 23 1219 eth1
-The following is an example of using the ``netstats``
-command to print the MBUF statistics:
-.. code:: c
+The following is an example of using the ``netstats`` command to print the MBUF
+statistics:
+
+.. code:: shell
[/] $ netstats -m
- \************ MBUF STATISTICS \************
+ ************ MBUF STATISTICS ************
mbufs:2048 clusters: 128 free: 63
drops: 0 waits: 0 drains: 0
free:1967 data:79 header:2 socket:0
@@ -99,13 +104,14 @@ command to print the MBUF statistics:
soname:0 soopts:0 ftable:0 rights:0
ifaddr:0 control:0 oobdata:0
-The following is an example of using the ``netstats``
-command to print the print the interface statistics:
-.. code:: c
+The following is an example of using the ``netstats`` command to print the
+print the interface statistics:
+
+.. code:: shell
[/] $ netstats -f
- \************ INTERFACE STATISTICS \************
- \***** eth1 \*****
+ ************ INTERFACE STATISTICS ************
+ ***** eth1 *****
Ethernet Address: 00:04:9F:00:5B:21
Address:192.168.1.244 Broadcast Address:192.168.1.255 Net mask:255.255.255.0
Flags: Up Broadcast Running Active Multicast
@@ -116,40 +122,44 @@ command to print the print the interface statistics:
Tx Interrupts:867 Deferred:0 Late Collision:0
Retransmit Limit:0 Underrun:0 Misaligned:0
-The following is an example of using the ``netstats``
-command to print the print IP statistics:
-.. code:: c
+The following is an example of using the ``netstats`` command to print the
+print IP statistics:
+
+.. code:: shell
[/] $ netstats -p
- \************ IP Statistics \************
- total packets received 894
+ ************ IP Statistics ************
+ total packets received 894
packets rcvd for unreachable dest 13
- datagrams delivered to upper level 881
- total ip packets generated here 871
+ datagrams delivered to upper level 881
+ total ip packets generated here 871
-The following is an example of using the ``netstats``
-command to print the ICMP statistics:
-.. code:: c
+The following is an example of using the ``netstats`` command to print the ICMP
+statistics:
+
+.. code:: shell
[/] $ netstats -c
- \************ ICMP Statistics \************
- Type 0 sent 843
+ ************ ICMP Statistics ************
+ Type 0 sent 843
number of responses 843
- Type 8 received 843
+ Type 8 received 843
-The following is an example of using the ``netstats``
-command to print the UDP statistics:
-.. code:: c
+The following is an example of using the ``netstats`` command to print the UDP
+statistics:
+
+.. code:: shell
[/] $ netstats -u
- \************ UDP Statistics \************
+ ************ UDP Statistics ************
-The following is an example of using the ``netstats``
-command to print the TCP statistics:
-.. code:: c
+The following is an example of using the ``netstats`` command to print the TCP
+statistics:
+
+.. code:: shell
[/] $ netstats -t
- \************ TCP Statistics \************
+ ************ TCP Statistics ************
connections accepted 1
connections established 1
segs where we tried to get rtt 34
@@ -172,13 +182,13 @@ command to print the TCP statistics:
.. index:: CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_NETSTATS
.. index:: CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_NETSTATS
-This command is included in the default shell command set.
-When building a custom command set, define``CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_NETSTATS`` to have this
+This command is included in the default shell command set. When building a
+custom command set, define ``CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_NETSTATS`` to have this
command included.
-This command can be excluded from the shell command set by
-defining ``CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_NETSTATS`` when all
-shell commands have been configured.
+This command can be excluded from the shell command set by defining
+``CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_NETSTATS`` when all shell commands have been
+configured.
**PROGRAMMING INFORMATION:**
@@ -186,26 +196,29 @@ shell commands have been configured.
The ``netstats`` is implemented by a C language function
which has the following prototype:
+
.. code:: c
int rtems_shell_rtems_main_netstats(
- int argc,
- char \**argv
+ int argc,
+ char **argv
);
-The configuration structure for the ``netstats`` has the
-following prototype:
+The configuration structure for the ``netstats`` has the following prototype:
+
.. code:: c
extern rtems_shell_cmd_t rtems_shell_NETSTATS_Command;
+.. _ifconfig:
+
ifconfig - configure a network interface
----------------------------------------
.. index:: ifconfig
**SYNOPSYS:**
-.. code:: c
+.. code:: shell
ifconfig
ifconfig interface
@@ -214,8 +227,8 @@ ifconfig - configure a network interface
**DESCRIPTION:**
-This command may be used to display information about the
-network interfaces in the system or configure them.
+This command may be used to display information about the network interfaces in
+the system or configure them.
**EXIT STATUS:**
@@ -223,16 +236,17 @@ This command returns 0 on success and non-zero if an error is encountered.
**NOTES:**
-Just like its counterpart on GNU/Linux and BSD systems, this command
-is complicated. More example usages would be a welcome submission.
+Just like its counterpart on GNU/Linux and BSD systems, this command is
+complicated. More example usages would be a welcome submission.
**EXAMPLES:**
The following is an example of how to use ``ifconfig``:
-.. code:: c
- ************ INTERFACE STATISTICS \************
- \***** eth1 \*****
+.. code:: shell
+
+ ************ INTERFACE STATISTICS ************
+ ***** eth1 *****
Ethernet Address: 00:04:9F:00:5B:21
Address:192.168.1.244 Broadcast Address:192.168.1.255 Net mask:255.255.255.0
Flags: Up Broadcast Running Active Multicast
@@ -248,55 +262,59 @@ The following is an example of how to use ``ifconfig``:
.. index:: CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_IFCONFIG
.. index:: CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_IFCONFIG
-This command is included in the default shell command set.
-When building a custom command set, define``CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_IFCONFIG`` to have this
+This command is included in the default shell command set. When building a
+custom command set, define ``CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_IFCONFIG`` to have this
command included.
-This command can be excluded from the shell command set by
-defining ``CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_IFCONFIG`` when all
-shell commands have been configured.
+This command can be excluded from the shell command set by defining
+``CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_IFCONFIG`` when all shell commands have been
+configured.
**PROGRAMMING INFORMATION:**
.. index:: rtems_shell_rtems_main_ifconfig
-The ``ifconfig`` is implemented by a C language function
-which has the following prototype:
+The ``ifconfig`` is implemented by a C language function which has the
+following prototype:
+
.. code:: c
int rtems_shell_rtems_main_ifconfig(
- int argc,
- char \**argv
+ int argc,
+ char **argv
);
-The configuration structure for the ``ifconfig`` has the
-following prototype:
+The configuration structure for the ``ifconfig`` has the following prototype:
+
.. code:: c
extern rtems_shell_cmd_t rtems_shell_IFCONFIG_Command;
+.. _route:
+
route - show or manipulate the ip routing table
-----------------------------------------------
.. index:: route
**SYNOPSYS:**
-.. code:: c
+.. code:: shell
- route \[subcommand] \[args]
+ route [subcommand] [args]
**DESCRIPTION:**
-This command is used to display and manipulate the routing table.
-When invoked with no arguments, the current routing information is
-displayed. When invoked with the subcommands ``add`` or ``del``,
-then additional arguments must be provided to describe the route.
+This command is used to display and manipulate the routing table. When invoked
+with no arguments, the current routing information is displayed. When invoked
+with the subcommands ``add`` or ``del``, then additional arguments must be
+provided to describe the route.
Command templates include the following:
-.. code:: c
- route \[add|del] -net IP_ADDRESS gw GATEWAY_ADDRESS \[netmask MASK]
- route \[add|del] -host IP_ADDRESS gw GATEWAY_ADDRES \[netmask MASK]
+.. code:: shell
+
+ route [add|del] -net IP_ADDRESS gw GATEWAY_ADDRESS [netmask MASK]
+ route [add|del] -host IP_ADDRESS gw GATEWAY_ADDRES [netmask MASK]
When not provided the netmask defaults to ``255.255.255.0``
@@ -306,13 +324,14 @@ This command returns 0 on success and non-zero if an error is encountered.
**NOTES:**
-Just like its counterpart on GNU/Linux and BSD systems, this command
-is complicated. More example usages would be a welcome submission.
+Just like its counterpart on GNU/Linux and BSD systems, this command is
+complicated. More example usages would be a welcome submission.
**EXAMPLES:**
-The following is an example of how to use ``route`` to display,
-add, and delete a new route:
+The following is an example of how to use ``route`` to display, add, and delete
+a new route:
+
.. code:: c
[/] $ route
@@ -322,8 +341,8 @@ add, and delete a new route:
192.168.1.14 00:A0:C8:1C:EE:28 UHL 1 0 1444 eth1
192.168.1.51 00:1D:7E:0C:D0:7C UHL 0 10844 1202 eth1
192.168.1.151 00:1C:23:B2:0F:BB UHL 2 37 1399 eth1
- \[/] $ route add -net 192.168.3.0 gw 192.168.1.14
- \[/] $ route
+ [/] $ route add -net 192.168.3.0 gw 192.168.1.14
+ [/] $ route
Destination Gateway/Mask/Hw Flags Refs Use Expire Interface
default 192.168.1.14 UGS 0 0 0 eth1
192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 1 eth1
@@ -331,8 +350,8 @@ add, and delete a new route:
192.168.1.51 00:1D:7E:0C:D0:7C UHL 0 14937 1202 eth1
192.168.1.151 00:1C:23:B2:0F:BB UHL 2 96 1399 eth1
192.168.3.0 192.168.1.14 UGS 0 0 0 eth1
- \[/] $ route del -net 192.168.3.0 gw 192.168.1.14
- \[/] $ route
+ [/] $ route del -net 192.168.3.0 gw 192.168.1.14
+ [/] $ route
Destination Gateway/Mask/Hw Flags Refs Use Expire Interface
default 192.168.1.14 UGS 0 0 0 eth1
192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 1 eth1
@@ -345,76 +364,78 @@ add, and delete a new route:
.. index:: CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_ROUTE
.. index:: CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_ROUTE
-This command is included in the default shell command set.
-When building a custom command set, define``CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_ROUTE`` to have this
+This command is included in the default shell command set. When building a
+custom command set, define ``CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_ROUTE`` to have this
command included.
-This command can be excluded from the shell command set by
-defining ``CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_ROUTE`` when all
-shell commands have been configured.
+This command can be excluded from the shell command set by defining
+``CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_ROUTE`` when all shell commands have been
+configured.
**PROGRAMMING INFORMATION:**
.. index:: rtems_shell_rtems_main_route
-The ``route`` is implemented by a C language function
-which has the following prototype:
+The ``route`` is implemented by a C language function which has the following
+prototype:
+
.. code:: c
int rtems_shell_rtems_main_route(
- int argc,
- char \**argv
+ int argc,
+ char **argv
);
-The configuration structure for the ``route`` has the
-following prototype:
+The configuration structure for the ``route`` has the following prototype:
+
.. code:: c
extern rtems_shell_cmd_t rtems_shell_ROUTE_Command;
+.. _ping:
+
ping - ping a host or IP address
--------------------------------
.. index:: ping
**SYNOPSYS:**
-.. code:: c
+.. code:: shell
- ping \[-AaDdfnoQqRrv] \[-c count] \[-G sweepmaxsize] \[-g sweepminsize]
- \[-h sweepincrsize] \[-i wait] \[-l preload] \[-M mask | time] \[-m ttl]
- \[-p pattern] \[-S src_addr] \[-s packetsize] \[-t timeout]
- \[-W waittime] \[-z tos] host
- ping \[-AaDdfLnoQqRrv] \[-c count] \[-I iface] \[-i wait] \[-l preload]
- \[-M mask | time] \[-m ttl] \[-p pattern] \[-S src_addr]
- \[-s packetsize] \[-T ttl] \[-t timeout] \[-W waittime]
- \[-z tos] mcast-group
+ ping [-AaDdfnoQqRrv] [-c count] [-G sweepmaxsize] [-g sweepminsize]
+ [-h sweepincrsize] [-i wait] [-l preload] [-M mask | time] [-m ttl]
+ [-p pattern] [-S src_addr] [-s packetsize] [-t timeout]
+ [-W waittime] [-z tos] host
+ ping [-AaDdfLnoQqRrv] [-c count] [-I iface] [-i wait] [-l preload]
+ [-M mask | time] [-m ttl] [-p pattern] [-S src_addr]
+ [-s packetsize] [-T ttl] [-t timeout] [-W waittime]
+ [-z tos] mcast-group
**DESCRIPTION:**
-The ping utility uses the ICMP protocol's mandatory ECHO_REQUEST
-datagram to elicit an ICMP ECHO_RESPONSE from a host or gateway.
-ECHO_REQUEST datagrams ("pings") have an IP and ICMP header,
-followed by a "struct timeval" and then an arbitrary number of
-"pad" bytes used to fill out the packet. The options are as
-follows:
+The ping utility uses the ICMP protocol's mandatory ECHO_REQUEST datagram to
+elicit an ICMP ECHO_RESPONSE from a host or gateway. ECHO_REQUEST datagrams
+("pings") have an IP and ICMP header, followed by a "struct timeval" and then
+an arbitrary number of "pad" bytes used to fill out the packet. The options
+are as follows:
*-A*
- Audible. Output a bell (ASCII 0x07) character when no packet is
- received before the next packet is transmitted. To cater for
- round-trip times that are longer than the interval between
- transmissions, further missing packets cause a bell only if the
- maximum number of unreceived packets has increased.
+ Audible. Output a bell (ASCII 0x07) character when no packet is received
+ before the next packet is transmitted. To cater for round-trip times that
+ are longer than the interval between transmissions, further missing packets
+ cause a bell only if the maximum number of unreceived packets has
+ increased.
*-a*
Audible. Include a bell (ASCII 0x07) character in the output when any
- packet is received. This option is ignored if other format options
- are present.
+ packet is received. This option is ignored if other format options are
+ present.
*-c count*
- Stop after sending (and receiving) count ECHO_RESPONSE packets. If
- this option is not specified, ping will operate until interrupted. If
- this option is specified in conjunction with ping sweeps, each sweep
- will consist of count packets.
+ Stop after sending (and receiving) count ECHO_RESPONSE packets. If this
+ option is not specified, ping will operate until interrupted. If this
+ option is specified in conjunction with ping sweeps, each sweep will
+ consist of count packets.
*-D*
Set the Don't Fragment bit.
@@ -423,126 +444,123 @@ follows:
Set the SO_DEBUG option on the socket being used.
*-f*
- Flood ping. Outputs packets as fast as they come back or one
- hundred times per second, whichever is more. For every ECHO_REQUEST
- sent a period "." is printed, while for every ECHO_REPLY received a
- backspace is printed. This provides a rapid display of how many
- packets are being dropped. Only the super-user may use this option.
- This can be very hard on a network and should be used with caution.
+ Flood ping. Outputs packets as fast as they come back or one hundred times
+ per second, whichever is more. For every ECHO_REQUEST sent a period "." is
+ printed, while for every ECHO_REPLY received a backspace is printed. This
+ provides a rapid display of how many packets are being dropped. Only the
+ super-user may use this option. This can be very hard on a network and
+ should be used with caution.
*-G sweepmaxsize*
- Specify the maximum size of ICMP payload when sending sweeping pings.
- This option is required for ping sweeps.
+ Specify the maximum size of ICMP payload when sending sweeping pings. This
+ option is required for ping sweeps.
*-g sweepminsize*
- Specify the size of ICMP payload to start with when sending sweeping
- pings. The default value is 0.
+ Specify the size of ICMP payload to start with when sending sweeping pings.
+ The default value is 0.
*-h sweepincrsize*
- Specify the number of bytes to increment the size of ICMP payload
- after each sweep when sending sweeping pings. The default value is 1.
+ Specify the number of bytes to increment the size of ICMP payload after
+ each sweep when sending sweeping pings. The default value is 1.
*-I iface*
- Source multicast packets with the given interface address. This flag
- only applies if the ping destination is a multicast address.
+ Source multicast packets with the given interface address. This flag only
+ applies if the ping destination is a multicast address.
*-i wait*
- Wait wait seconds between sending each packet. The default is to wait
- for one second between each packet. The wait time may be fractional,
- but only the super-user may specify values less than 1 second. This
- option is incompatible with the -f option.
+ Wait wait seconds between sending each packet. The default is to wait for
+ one second between each packet. The wait time may be fractional, but only
+ the super-user may specify values less than 1 second. This option is
+ incompatible with the -f option.
*-L*
- Suppress loopback of multicast packets. This flag only applies if the
- ping destination is a multicast address.
+ Suppress loopback of multicast packets. This flag only applies if the ping
+ destination is a multicast address.
*-l preload*
- If preload is specified, ping sends that many packets as fast as
- possible before falling into its normal mode of behavior. Only the
- super-user may use this option.
+ If preload is specified, ping sends that many packets as fast as possible
+ before falling into its normal mode of behavior. Only the super-user may
+ use this option.
*-M mask | time*
- Use ICMP_MASKREQ or ICMP_TSTAMP instead of ICMP_ECHO. For mask, print
- the netmask of the remote machine. Set the net.inet.icmp.maskrepl MIB
- variable to enable ICMP_MASKREPLY. For time, print the origination,
- reception and transmission timestamps.
+ Use ICMP_MASKREQ or ICMP_TSTAMP instead of ICMP_ECHO. For mask, print the
+ netmask of the remote machine. Set the net.inet.icmp.maskrepl MIB variable
+ to enable ICMP_MASKREPLY. For time, print the origination, reception and
+ transmission timestamps.
*-m ttl*
- Set the IP Time To Live for outgoing packets. If not specified, the
- kernel uses the value of the net.inet.ip.ttl MIB variable.
+ Set the IP Time To Live for outgoing packets. If not specified, the kernel
+ uses the value of the net.inet.ip.ttl MIB variable.
*-n*
- Numeric output only. No attempt will be made to lookup symbolic names
- for host addresses.
+ Numeric output only. No attempt will be made to lookup symbolic names for
+ host addresses.
*-o*
Exit successfully after receiving one reply packet.
*-p pattern*
- You may specify up to 16 "pad" bytes to fill out the packet you
- send. This is useful for diagnosing data-dependent problems in a
- network. For example, "-p ff" will cause the sent packet to be
- filled with all ones.
+ You may specify up to 16 "pad" bytes to fill out the packet you send. This
+ is useful for diagnosing data-dependent problems in a network. For
+ example, "-p ff" will cause the sent packet to be filled with all ones.
*-Q*
Somewhat quiet output. Don't display ICMP error messages that are in
- response to our query messages. Originally, the -v flag was required
- to display such errors, but -v displays all ICMP error messages. On a
- busy machine, this output can be overbear- ing. Without the -Q flag,
- ping prints out any ICMP error mes- sages caused by its own
- ECHO_REQUEST messages.
+ response to our query messages. Originally, the -v flag was required to
+ display such errors, but -v displays all ICMP error messages. On a busy
+ machine, this output can be overbear- ing. Without the -Q flag, ping
+ prints out any ICMP error mes- sages caused by its own ECHO_REQUEST
+ messages.
*-q*
- Quiet output. Nothing is displayed except the summary lines at
- startup time and when finished.
+ Quiet output. Nothing is displayed except the summary lines at startup
+ time and when finished.
*-R*
- Record route. Includes the RECORD_ROUTE option in the ECHO_REQUEST
- packet and displays the route buffer on returned packets. Note that
- the IP header is only large enough for nine such routes; the
- traceroute(8) command is usually better at determining the route
- packets take to a particular destination. If more routes come back
- than should, such as due to an illegal spoofed packet, ping will print
- the route list and then truncate it at the correct spot. Many hosts
- ignore or discard the RECORD_ROUTE option.
+ Record route. Includes the RECORD_ROUTE option in the ECHO_REQUEST packet
+ and displays the route buffer on returned packets. Note that the IP header
+ is only large enough for nine such routes; the traceroute(8) command is
+ usually better at determining the route packets take to a particular
+ destination. If more routes come back than should, such as due to an
+ illegal spoofed packet, ping will print the route list and then truncate it
+ at the correct spot. Many hosts ignore or discard the RECORD_ROUTE option.
*-r*
- Bypass the normal routing tables and send directly to a host on an
- attached network. If the host is not on a directly-attached network,
- an error is returned. This option can be used to ping a local host
- through an interface that has no route through it (e.g., after the
- interface was dropped).
+ Bypass the normal routing tables and send directly to a host on an attached
+ network. If the host is not on a directly-attached network, an error is
+ returned. This option can be used to ping a local host through an
+ interface that has no route through it (e.g., after the interface was
+ dropped).
*-S src_addr*
- Use the following IP address as the source address in outgoing
- packets. On hosts with more than one IP address, this option can be
- used to force the source address to be something other than the IP
- address of the interface the probe packet is sent on. If the IP
- address is not one of this machine's interface addresses, an error is
- returned and nothing is sent.
+ Use the following IP address as the source address in outgoing packets. On
+ hosts with more than one IP address, this option can be used to force the
+ source address to be something other than the IP address of the interface
+ the probe packet is sent on. If the IP address is not one of this
+ machine's interface addresses, an error is returned and nothing is sent.
*-s packetsize*
Specify the number of data bytes to be sent. The default is 56, which
- translates into 64 ICMP data bytes when combined with the 8 bytes of
- ICMP header data. Only the super-user may specify val- ues more than
- default. This option cannot be used with ping sweeps.
+ translates into 64 ICMP data bytes when combined with the 8 bytes of ICMP
+ header data. Only the super-user may specify val- ues more than default.
+ This option cannot be used with ping sweeps.
*-T ttl*
- Set the IP Time To Live for multicasted packets. This flag only
- applies if the ping destination is a multicast address.
+ Set the IP Time To Live for multicasted packets. This flag only applies if
+ the ping destination is a multicast address.
*-t timeout*
- Specify a timeout, in seconds, before ping exits regardless of how
- many packets have been received.
+ Specify a timeout, in seconds, before ping exits regardless of how many
+ packets have been received.
*-v*
- Verbose output. ICMP packets other than ECHO_RESPONSE that are
- received are listed.
+ Verbose output. ICMP packets other than ECHO_RESPONSE that are received
+ are listed.
*-W waittime*
- Time in milliseconds to wait for a reply for each packet sent. If a
- reply arrives later, the packet is not printed as replied, but
- considered as replied when calculating statistics.
+ Time in milliseconds to wait for a reply for each packet sent. If a reply
+ arrives later, the packet is not printed as replied, but considered as
+ replied when calculating statistics.
*-z tos*
Use the specified type of service.
@@ -554,33 +572,34 @@ The ping utility exits with one of the following values:
0 At least one response was heard from the specified host.
2 The transmission was successful but no responses were
-received.
+ received.
-any other value an error occurred. These values are defined in
-<sysexits.h>.
+any other value an error occurred. These values are defined in <sysexits.h>.
**NOTES:**
-When using ping for fault isolation, it should first be run on the
-local host, to verify that the local network interface is up and
-running. Then, hosts and gateways further and further away should be
-"pinged". Round-trip times and packet loss statistics are computed.
-If duplicate packets are received, they are not included in the packet
-loss calculation, although the round trip time of these packets is
-used in calculating the round-trip time statistics. When the
-specified number of packets have been sent a brief summary is
-displayed, showing the number of packets sent and received, and the
-minimum, mean, maximum, and standard deviation of the round-trip
-times.
+When using ping for fault isolation, it should first be run on the local host,
+to verify that the local network interface is up and running. Then, hosts and
+gateways further and further away should be "pinged". Round-trip times and
+packet loss statistics are computed. If duplicate packets are received, they
+are not included in the packet loss calculation, although the round trip time
+of these packets is used in calculating the round-trip time statistics. When
+the specified number of packets have been sent a brief summary is displayed,
+showing the number of packets sent and received, and the minimum, mean,
+maximum, and standard deviation of the round-trip times.
This program is intended for use in network testing, measurement and
-management. Because of the load it can impose on the network, it is
-unwise to use ping during normal operations or from automated scripts.
+management. Because of the load it can impose on the network, it is unwise to
+use ping during normal operations or from automated scripts.
+
+This command can fail if more than the FD_SET size number of file descriptors
+are open.
**EXAMPLES:**
The following is an example of how to use ``oing`` to ping:
-.. code:: c
+
+.. code:: shell
[/] # ping 10.10.10.1
PING 10.10.10.1 (10.10.10.1): 56 data bytes
@@ -592,7 +611,7 @@ The following is an example of how to use ``oing`` to ping:
--- 10.10.10.1 ping statistics ---
5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0.0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 0.229/0.256/0.356/0.050 ms
- \[/] # ping -f -c 10000 10.10.10.1
+ [/] # ping -f -c 10000 10.10.10.1
PING 10.10.10.1 (10.10.10.1): 56 data bytes
.
--- 10.10.10.1 ping statistics ---
@@ -604,29 +623,30 @@ The following is an example of how to use ``oing`` to ping:
.. index:: CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_PING
.. index:: CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_PING
-This command is included in the default shell command set.
-When building a custom command set, define``CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_PING`` to have this
+This command is included in the default shell command set. When building a
+custom command set, define ``CONFIGURE_SHELL_COMMAND_PING`` to have this
command included.
-This command can be excluded from the shell command set by
-defining ``CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_PING`` when all
-shell commands have been configured.
+This command can be excluded from the shell command set by defining
+``CONFIGURE_SHELL_NO_COMMAND_PING`` when all shell commands have been
+configured.
**PROGRAMMING INFORMATION:**
.. index:: rtems_shell_rtems_main_ping
-The ``ping`` is implemented by a C language function
-which has the following prototype:
+The ``ping`` is implemented by a C language function which has the following
+prototype:
+
.. code:: c
int rtems_shell_rtems_main_ping(
- int argc,
- char \**argv
+ int argc,
+ char **argv
);
-The configuration structure for the ``ping`` has the
-following prototype:
+The configuration structure for the ``ping`` has the following prototype:
+
.. code:: c
extern rtems_shell_cmd_t rtems_shell_PING_Command;