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authorJoel Sherrill <joel@rtems.org>2016-10-28 16:40:44 -0500
committerJoel Sherrill <joel@rtems.org>2016-10-30 12:49:11 -0500
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tree1b7f06fa42fc27ad9e2f53a94f11bada767139a8 /rsb/source-builder.rst
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RSB: Initial addition
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+.. comment SPDX-License-Identifier: CC-BY-SA-4.0
+
+.. comment COPYRIGHT (c) 2012 - 2016.
+.. comment Chris Johns <chrisj@rtems.org>
+
+RTEMS Tools From Source
+#######################
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder is a tool to aid building packages from source used by
+the RTEMS project. It helps consolidate the details you need to build a package
+from source in a controlled and verifiable way. The tool is aimed at developers
+of software who use tool sets for embedded type development and is not limited
+to building just for RTEMS. Embedded development typically uses cross-compiling
+tool chains, debuggers, and debugging aids. Together we call these a 'tool
+set'. The RTEMS Source Builder is not limited to this role but designed to fit
+with-in this specific niche. It can be used outside of the RTEMS project and we
+welcome this happening in other open source or commercial projects.
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder is typically used to build a set of tools or a 'build
+set'. A 'build set' is a collection of packages and a package is a specific
+tool, for example gcc or gdb. The RTEMS Source Builder attempts to support any
+host environment that runs Python and you can build the package on. It is not
+some sort of magic that can take any piece of source code and make it
+build. Someone at some point in time has figured out how to build that package
+from source and taught this tool. The RTEMS Source Builder has been tested on:
+
+.. _platform_links:
+
+- :ref:`ArchLinux`
+
+- :ref:`CentOS`
+
+- :ref:`Fedora`
+
+- :ref:`Raspbian`
+
+- :ref:`Ubuntu` (includes XUbuntu)
+
+- :ref:`Linux Mint`
+
+- :ref:`openSUSE`
+
+- :ref:`FreeBSD`
+
+- :ref:`NetBSD`
+
+- :ref:`MacOS`
+
+- :ref:`Windows`
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder has two types of configuration data. The first is the
+*build set*. A *build set* describes a collection of packages that define a set
+of tools you would use when developing software for RTEMS. For example the
+basic GNU tool set is binutils, gcc, and gdb and is the typical base suite of
+tools you need for an embedded cross-development type project. The second type
+of configuration data is the configuration files and they define how a package
+is built. Configuration files are scripts loosely based on the RPM spec file
+format and they detail the steps needed to build a package. The steps are
+'preparation', 'building', and 'installing'. Scripts support macros, shell
+expansion, logic, includes plus many more features useful when build packages.
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder does not interact with any host package management
+systems. There is no automatic dependence checking between various packages you
+build or packages and software your host system you may have installed. We
+assume the build sets and configuration files you are using have been created
+by developers who do. Support is provided for package config or pkgconfg type
+files so you can check and use standard libraries if present. If you have a
+problem please ask on the RTEMS Users mailing list.
+
+This documentation caters for a range of users from new to experienced RTEMS
+developers. New users can follow the Quick Start section up to the "Installing
+and Tar Files" to get a working tools and RTEMS. Users building a binary tool
+set for release can read the "Installing and Tar Files". Users wanting to run
+and test bleeding edge tools or packages, or wanting update or extend the RSB's
+configuration can read the remaining sections.
+
+.. sidebar: Bug Reporting:
+ IMPORTANT: If you have a problem please see <<_bugs,the reporting bugs>>
+ section.
+
+Quick Start
+###########
+
+The quick start will show you how to build a set of RTEMS tools for a supported
+architecture. The tools are installed into a build *prefix*. The *prefix* is the
+top of a group of directories containing all the files needed to develop RTEMS
+applications. Building an RTEMS build set will build all that you need. This
+includes autoconf, automake, assemblers, linkers, compilers, debuggers,
+standard libraries and RTEMS itself.
+
+There is no need to become root or the administrator and we recommend you
+avoid doing this. You can build and install the tools anywhere on the
+host's file system you, as a standard user, have read and write access
+too. I recommend you use your home directory and work under the directory
+``~/development/rtems``. The examples shown here will do this.
+
+You can use the build *prefix* to install and maintain different versions of
+the tools. Doing this lets you try a new set of tools while not touching your
+proven working production set of tools. Once you have proven the new tools are
+working rebuild with the 'production' prefix switching your development to them.
+
+I also suggest you keep your environment to the bare minimum, particularly the
+path variable. Using environment variables has been proven over the years to be
+difficult to manage in production systems.
+
+.. comment Host Setup
+
+.. note:: Host Setup
+ IMPORTANT: Before proceeding to the next section please refer to the
+ <<_host_setups,host specific setup>> for your host and install any extra
+ packages. The RSB assumes the needed packages are installed and work.
+
+.. comment .Path to use when building applications
+
+.. note:: Path to use when building applications
+ TIP: Do not forget to do this before you use the tools such as build RTEMS.
+
+The RSB by default will install (copy) the executables under the prefix
+you supply. To use the tools once finished just set your path to the
+'bin' directory under the *prefix* you use. In the examples that follow
+the *prefix* is ``$HOME/development/rtems/4.11`` and is set using
+the ``--prefix`` option so the path you need to configure to build
+applications can be set with the following
+in a BASH shell:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ export PATH=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11/bin:$PATH
+
+Make sure you place the RTEMS tool path at the front of your path so they are
+searched first. RTEMS can provide newer versions of some tools your operating
+system provides and placing the RTEMS tools path at the front means it is
+searched first and the RTEMS needed versions of the tools are used.
+
+.. note::
+
+ RSB and RTEMS have matching ``git branch`` for each version of RTEMS.
+ For example, if you want to build a toolchain for 4.11, then you
+ should checkout the 4.11 branch of the RSB:
+
+ ``$ git checkout -t origin/4.11``
+
+ Branches are available for the 4.9, 4.10, and 4.11 versions of RTEMS.
+
+Setup
+~~~~~
+
+Setup a development work space:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ cd
+ $ mkdir -p development/rtems/src
+ $ cd development/rtems/src
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder is distributed as source. It is Python code so all you
+need to do is head over to the RTEMS GIT repository and clone the code directly
+from git:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ git clone git://git.rtems.org/rtems-source-builder.git
+ $ cd rtems-source-builder
+
+Checking
+~~~~~~~~
+
+The next step is to check if your host is set up correctly. The RTEMS Source
+Builder provides a tool to help:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ source-builder/sb-check
+ warning: exe: absolute exe found in path: (__objcopy) /usr/local/bin/objcopy **<1>**
+ warning: exe: absolute exe found in path: (__objdump) /usr/local/bin/objdump
+ error: exe: not found: (_xz) /usr/local/bin/xz **<2>**
+ RTEMS Source Builder environment is not correctly set up
+ $ source-builder/sb-check
+ RTEMS Source Builder environment is ok **<3>**
+
+
+- **<1>** A tool is in the environment path but does not match the
+ expected path.
+
+- **<2>** The executable 'xz' is not found.
+
+- **<3>** The host's environment is set up correct.
+
+The checking tool will output a list of executable files not found if problems
+are detected. Locate those executable files and install them. You may also be
+given a list of warnings about executable files not in the expected location
+however the executable was located somewhere in your environment's path. You
+will need to check each tool to determine if this is an issue. An executable
+not in the standard location may indicate it is not the host operating system's
+standard tool. It maybe ok or it could be buggy, only you can determine this.
+
+The <<_host_setups,Host Setups>> section lists packages you should install for
+common host operating systems. It maybe worth checking if you have those
+installed.
+
+Build Sets
+~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The RTEMS tools can be built within the RTEMS Source Builder's source tree. We
+recommend you do this so lets change into the RTEMS directory in the RTEMS
+Source Builder package:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ cd rtems
+
+If you are unsure how to specify the build set for the architecture you wish to
+build ask the tool:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --list-bsets <1>
+ RTEMS Source Builder - Set Builder, v0.2.0
+ Examining: config <2>
+ Examining: ../source-builder/config <2>
+ 4.10/rtems-all.bset <3>
+ 4.10/rtems-arm.bset <4>
+ 4.10/rtems-autotools.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-avr.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-bfin.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-h8300.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-i386.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-lm32.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-m32c.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-m32r.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-m68k.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-mips.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-nios2.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-powerpc.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-sh.bset
+ 4.10/rtems-sparc.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-all.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-arm.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-autotools.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-avr.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-bfin.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-h8300.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-i386.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-lm32.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-m32c.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-m32r.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-m68k.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-microblaze.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-mips.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-moxie.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-nios2.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-powerpc.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-sh.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-sparc.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-sparc64.bset
+ 4.11/rtems-v850.bset
+ 4.9/rtems-all.bset
+ 4.9/rtems-arm.bset
+ 4.9/rtems-autotools.bset
+ 4.9/rtems-i386.bset
+ 4.9/rtems-m68k.bset
+ 4.9/rtems-mips.bset
+ 4.9/rtems-powerpc.bset
+ 4.9/rtems-sparc.bset
+ gnu-tools-4.6.bset
+ rtems-4.10-base.bset <5>
+ rtems-4.11-base.bset
+ rtems-4.9-base.bset
+ rtems-base.bset <5>
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-all.bset <6>
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-arm.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-avr.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-bfin.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-h8300.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-i386.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-lm32.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-m32c.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-m32r.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-m68k.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-microblaze.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-mips.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-moxie.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-powerpc.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-sh.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-sparc.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-sparc64.bset
+ unstable/4.11/rtems-v850.bset
+
+- *<1>* Only option needed is ``--list-bsets``
+
+- *<2>* The paths inspected. See <<X1,``_configdir``>> variable.
+
+- *<3>* Build all RTEMS 4.10 supported architectures.
+
+- *<4>* The build set for the ARM architecture on RTEMS 4.10.
+
+- *<5>* Support build set file with common functionality included by
+ other build set files.
+
+- *<6>* Unstable tool sets are used by RTEMS developers to test new
+ tool sets. You are welcome to try them but you must remember they are
+ unstable, can change at any point in time and your application may
+ not work. If you have an issue with a production tool it may pay to
+ try the unstable tool to see if it has been resolved.
+
+Building
+~~~~~~~~
+
+In this quick start I will build a SPARC tool set.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=l-sparc.txt <1> \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 <2> 4.11/rtems-sparc <3>
+ Source Builder - Set Builder, v0.2.0
+ Build Set: 4.11/rtems-sparc
+ config: expat-2.1.0-1.cfg <4>
+ package: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ building: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ config: tools/rtems-binutils-2.22-1.cfg <5>
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ config: tools/rtems-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1.cfg <6>
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ config: tools/rtems-gdb-7.5.1-1.cfg <7>
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ installing: rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1 -> /home/chris/development/rtems/4.11 <8>
+ installing: rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1 -> /home/chris/development/rtems/4.11
+ installing: rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1 -> /home/chris/development/rtems/4.11
+ installing: rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1 -> /home/chris/development/rtems/4.11
+ cleaning: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1 <9>
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ Build Set: Time 0:13:43.616383 <10>
+
+- *<1>* Providing a log file redirects the build output into a file. Logging the
+ build output provides a simple way to report problems.
+
+- *<2>* The prefix is the location on your file system the tools are installed
+ into. Provide a prefix to a location you have read and write access. You
+ can use the prefix to install different versions or builds of tools. Just
+ use the path to the tools you want to use when building RTEMS.
+
+- *<3>* The build set. This is the SPARC build set. First a specifically
+ referenced file is checked for and if not found the '%{_configdir} path
+ is searched. The set builder will first look for files with a ``.bset``
+ extension and then for a configuration file with a ``.cfg`` extension.
+
+- *<4>* The SPARC build set first builds the expat library as it is used in GDB.
+ This is the expat configuration used.
+
+- *<5>* The binutils build configuration.
+
+- *<6>* The GCC and Newlib build configuration.
+
+- *<7>* The GDB build configuration.
+
+- *<8>* Installing the built packages to the install prefix.
+
+- *<9>* All the packages built are cleaned at the end. If the build fails
+ all the needed files are present. You may have to clean up by deleting
+ the build directory if the build fails.
+
+- *<10>* The time to build the package. This lets you see how different
+ host hardware or configurations perform.
+
+Your SPARC RTEMS 4.11 tool set will be installed and ready to build RTEMS and
+RTEMS applications. When the build runs you will notice the tool fetch the
+source code from the internet. These files are cached in a directory called
+``source``. If you run the build again the cached files are used. This is what
+happened in the shown example before.
+
+TIP: The RSB for releases will automatically build and install RTEMS. The
+development version require adding ``--with-rtems``. Use this for a single
+command to get the tools and RTEMS with one command.
+
+The installed tools:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ls $HOME/development/rtems/4.11
+ bin include lib libexec share sparc-rtems4.11
+ $ ls $HOME/development/rtems/4.11/bin
+ sparc-rtems4.11-addr2line sparc-rtems4.11-cpp
+ sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-ar sparc-rtems4.11-gprof
+ sparc-rtems4.11-objdump sparc-rtems4.11-size
+ sparc-rtems4.11-ar sparc-rtems4.11-elfedit
+ sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-nm sparc-rtems4.11-ld
+ sparc-rtems4.11-ranlib sparc-rtems4.11-strings
+ sparc-rtems4.11-as sparc-rtems4.11-g++
+ sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-ranlib sparc-rtems4.11-ld.bfd
+ sparc-rtems4.11-readelf sparc-rtems4.11-strip
+ sparc-rtems4.11-c++ sparc-rtems4.11-gcc
+ sparc-rtems4.11-gcov sparc-rtems4.11-nm
+ sparc-rtems4.11-run xmlwf
+ sparc-rtems4.11-c++filt sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2
+ sparc-rtems4.11-gdb sparc-rtems4.11-objcopy
+ sparc-rtems4.11-sis
+ $ $HOME/development/rtems/4.11/bin/sparc-rtems4.11-gcc -v
+ Using built-in specs.
+ COLLECT_GCC=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11/bin/sparc-rtems4.11-gcc
+ COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11/bin/../ \
+ libexec/gcc/sparc-rtems4.11/4.7.2/lto-wrapper
+ Target: sparc-rtems4.11 <1>
+ Configured with: ../gcc-4.7.2/configure <2>
+ --prefix=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11
+ --bindir=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11/bin
+ --exec_prefix=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11
+ --includedir=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11/include
+ --libdir=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11/lib
+ --libexecdir=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11/libexec
+ --mandir=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11/share/man
+ --infodir=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11/share/info
+ --datadir=/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11/share
+ --build=x86_64-freebsd9.1 --host=x86_64-freebsd9.1 --target=sparc-rtems4.11
+ --disable-libstdcxx-pch --with-gnu-as --with-gnu-ld --verbose --with-newlib
+ --with-system-zlib --disable-nls --without-included-gettext
+ --disable-win32-registry --enable-version-specific-runtime-libs --disable-lto
+ --enable-threads --enable-plugin --enable-newlib-io-c99-formats
+ --enable-newlib-iconv --enable-languages=c,c++
+ Thread model: rtems <3>
+ gcc version 4.7.2 20120920 <4>
+ (RTEMS4.11-RSB(cb12e4875c203f794a5cd4b3de36101ff9a88403)-1,gcc-4.7.2/newlib-2.0.0) (GCC)
+
+- *<1>* The target the compiler is built for.
+
+- *<2>* The configure options used to build GCC.
+
+- *<3>* The threading model is always RTEMS. This makes the RTEMS tools
+ difficult for bare metal development more difficult.
+
+- *<4>* The version string. It contains the Git hash of the RTEMS Source Builder
+ you are using. If your local clone has been modifed that state is also
+ recorded in the version string. The hash allows you to track from a GCC
+ executable back to the original source used to build it.
+
+NOTE: The RTEMS thread model enables specific hooks in GCC so applications
+built with RTEMS tools need the RTEMS runtime to operate correctly. You can use
+RTEMS tools to build bare metal component but it is more difficult than with a
+bare metal tool chain and you need to know what you are doing at a low
+level. The RTEMS Source Builder can build bare metal tool chains as well. Look
+in the top level ``bare`` directory.
+
+Distributing and Archiving A Build
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+If you wish to create and distribute your build or you want to archive a build
+you can create a tar file. This is a more advanced method for binary packaging
+and installing of tools.
+
+By default the RTEMS Source Builder installs the built packages directly and
+optionally it can also create a *build set tar file* or a *package tar file*
+per package built. The normal and default behaviour is to let the RTEMS Source
+Builder install the tools. The source will be downloaded, built, installed and
+cleaned up.
+
+The tar files are created with the full build prefix present and if you follow
+the examples given in this documentation the path is absolute. This can cause
+problems if you are installing on a host you do not have super user or
+administrator rights on because the prefix path may references part you do not
+have write access too and tar will not extract the files. You can use the
+``--strip-components`` option in tar if your host tar application supports it to
+remove the parts you do not have write access too or you may need to unpack the
+tar file somewhere and copy the file tree from the level you have write access
+from. Embedding the full prefix path in the tar files lets you know what the
+prefix is and is recommended. For example if
+``/home/chris/development/rtems/4.11`` is the prefix used you cannot change
+directory to the root (``/``) and install because the ``/home`` is root access
+only. To install you would:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ cd
+ $ tar --strip-components=3 -xjf rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1.tar.bz2
+
+
+A build set tar file is created by adding ``--bset-tar-file`` option to the
+``sb-set-builder`` command.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=l-sparc.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 \
+ --bset-tar-file <1> 4.11/rtems-sparc
+ Source Builder - Set Builder, v0.2.0
+ Build Set: 4.11/rtems-sparc
+ config: expat-2.1.0-1.cfg
+ package: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ building: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ config: tools/rtems-binutils-2.22-1.cfg
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ config: tools/rtems-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1.cfg
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ config: tools/rtems-gdb-7.5.1-1.cfg
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ installing: rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1 -> /home/chris/development/rtems/4.11 <2>
+ installing: rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1 -> /home/chris/development/rtems/4.11
+ installing: rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1 -> /home/chris/development/rtems/4.11
+ installing: rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1 -> /home/chris/development/rtems/4.11
+ tarball: tar/rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1.tar.bz2 <3>
+ cleaning: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ Build Set: Time 0:15:25.92873
+
+
+- *<1>* The option to create a build set tar file.
+
+- *<2>* The installation still happens unless you specify ``--no-install``.
+
+- *<3>* Creating the build set tar file.
+
+You can also suppress installing the files using the ``--no-install`` option to
+the ``sb-set-builder`` command. This is usefu if your prefix is not accessiable
+when building Canadian cross compiled tool sets.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=l-sparc.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 \
+ --bset-tar-file --no-install <1> 4.11/rtems-sparc
+ Source Builder - Set Builder, v0.2.0
+ Build Set: 4.11/rtems-sparc
+ config: expat-2.1.0-1.cfg
+ package: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ building: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ config: tools/rtems-binutils-2.22-1.cfg
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ config: tools/rtems-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1.cfg
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ config: tools/rtems-gdb-7.5.1-1.cfg
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ tarball: tar/rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1.tar.bz2 <2>
+ cleaning: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ Build Set: Time 0:14:11.721274
+ $ ls tar
+ rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1.tar.bz2
+
+* *<1>* The option to supressing installing the packages.
+
+* *<2>* Create the build set tar.
+
+A package tar file can be created by adding the ``--pkg-tar-files`` to the
+``sb-set-builder`` command. This creates a tar file per package built in the
+build set.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=l-sparc.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 \
+ --bset-tar-file --pkg-tar-files <1> --no-install 4.11/rtems-sparc
+ Source Builder - Set Builder, v0.2.0
+ Build Set: 4.11/rtems-sparc
+ config: expat-2.1.0-1.cfg
+ package: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ building: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ config: tools/rtems-binutils-2.22-1.cfg
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ config: tools/rtems-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1.cfg
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ config: tools/rtems-gdb-7.5.1-1.cfg
+ package: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ building: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ tarball: tar/rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1.tar.bz2
+ cleaning: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1
+ cleaning: sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1
+ Build Set: Time 0:14:37.658460
+ $ ls tar
+ expat-2.1.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1.tar.bz2 sparc-rtems4.11-binutils-2.22-1.tar.bz2
+ sparc-rtems4.11-gdb-7.5.1-1.tar.bz2 <2> rtems-4.11-sparc-rtems4.11-1.tar.bz2 <3>
+ sparc-rtems4.11-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-1.20.0-1.tar.bz2
+
+- *<1>* The option to create packages tar files.
+
+- *<2>* The GDB package tar file.
+
+- *<3>* The build set tar file. All the others in a single tar file.
+
+Controlling the Build
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Build sets can be controlled via the command line to enable and disable various
+features. There is no definitive list of build options that can be listed
+because they are implemented with the configuration scripts. The best way to
+find what is available is to grep the configuration files. for ``with`` and
+``without``.
+
+Following are currentlt available:
+
+'--without-rtems':: Do not build RTEMS when building an RTEMS build set.
+'--without-cxx':: Do not build a C++ compiler.
+'--with-objc':: Attempt to build a C++ compiler.
+'--with-fortran':: Attempt to build a Fortran compiler.
+
+Why Build from Source?
+######################
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder is not a replacement for the binary install systems
+you have with commercial operating systems or open source operating system
+distributions. Those products and distributions are critically important and
+are the base that allows the Source Builder to work. The RTEMS Source Builder
+sits somewhere between you manually entering the commands to build a tool set
+and a tool such as ``yum`` or ``apt-get`` to install binary packages made
+specifically for your host operating system. Building manually or installing a
+binary package from a remote repository are valid and real alternatives while
+the Source Builder is attempting to provide a specific service of repeatably
+being able to build tool sets from source code.
+
+If you are developing a system or product that has a long shelf life or is used
+in a critical piece of infrastructure that has a long life cycle being able to
+build from source is important. It insulates the project from the fast ever
+changing world of the host development machines. If your tool set is binary and
+you have lost the ability to build it you have lost a degree of control and
+flexibility open source gives you. Fast moving host environments are
+fantastic. We have powerful multi-core computers with huge amounts of memory
+and state of the art operating systems to run on them however the product or
+project you are part of may need to be maintained well past the life time of
+these host. Being able to build from source an important and critical part of
+this process because you can move to a newer host and create an equivalent tool
+set.
+
+Building from source provides you with control over the configuration of the
+package you are building. If all or the most important dependent parts are
+built from source you limit the exposure to host variations. For example the
+GNU C compiler (gcc) currently uses a number of 3rd party libraries internally
+(gmp, mpfr, etc). If your validated compiler generating code for your target
+processor is dynamically linked against the host's version of these libraries
+any change in the host's configuration may effect you. The changes the host's
+package management system makes may be perfectly reasonable in relation to the
+distribution being managed however this may not extend to you and your
+tools. Building your tools from source and controlling the specific version of
+these dependent parts means you are not exposing yourself to unexpected and
+often difficult to resolve problems. On the other side you need to make sure
+your tools build and work with newer versions of the host operating
+system. Given the stability of standards based libraries like 'libc' and ever
+improving support for standard header file locations this task is becoming
+easier.
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder is designed to be audited and incorporated into a
+project's verification and validation process. If your project is developing
+critical applications that needs to be traced from source to executable code in
+the target, you need to also consider the tools and how to track them.
+
+If your IT department maintains all your computers and you do not have suitable
+rights to install binary packages, building from source lets you create your
+own tool set that you install under your home directory. Avoiding installing
+any extra packages as a super user is always helpful in maintaining a secure
+computing environment.
+
+.. comment [[_bugs]]
+
+Bugs, Crashes, and Build Failures
+#################################
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder is a Python program and every care is taken to test
+the code however bugs, crashes, and build failures can and do happen. If you
+find a bug please report it via the RTEMS Bug tracker tool Bugzilla or via
+email on the RTEMS Users list. RTEMS's bugzilla is found at
+https://www.rtems.org/bugzilla/.
+
+Please include the generated RSB report. If you see the following a report has
+been generated:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ ...
+ ...
+ Build FAILED <1>
+ See error report: rsb-report-4.11-rtems-lm32.txt <2>
+
+- *<1>* The build has failed.
+
+- *<2>* The report's file name.
+
+The generated report contains the command line, version of the RSB, your host's
+``uname`` details, the version of Python and the last 200 lines of the log.
+
+If for some reason there is no report please send please report the following:
+
+* Command line,
+
+* The git hash,
+
+* Host details with the output of the ``uname -a`` command,
+
+* If you have made any modifications.
+
+If there is a Python crash please cut and paste the Python backtrace
+into the bug report. If the tools fail to build please locate the first
+error in the log file. This can be difficult to find on hosts with many
+cores so it sometimes pays to re-run the command with the ``--jobs=none``
+option to get a log that is correctly sequenced. If searching the log
+file seach for ``error:`` and the error should be just above it.
+
+.. comment [[_contributing]]
+
+Contributing
+############
+
+We welcome all users adding, fixing, updating and upgrading packages and their
+configurations. The RSB is open source and open to contributions. These can be
+bug fixes, new features or new configurations. Please break patches down into
+changes to the core Python code, configuration changes or new configurations.
+
+Please email me patches via git so I can maintain your commit messages so you
+are acknowledged as the contributor.
+
+Most of what follows is related to the development of RSB and it's
+configurations.
+
+Project Sets
+############
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder supports project configurations. Project
+configurations can be public or private and can be contained in the RTEMS
+Source Builder project if suitable, other projects they use the RTEMS Source
+Builder or privately on your local file system.
+
+The configuration file loader searches the macro ``_configdir`` and by
+default this is set to ``%{\_topdir}/config:%{\_sbdir}/config`` where
+``_topdir`` is the your current working direct, in other words the
+directory you invoke the RTEMS Source Builder command in, and ``_sbdir``
+is the directory where the RTEMS Source Builder command resides. Therefore
+the ``config`` directory under each of these is searched so all you need
+to do is create a ``config`` in your project and add your configuration
+files. They do not need to be under the RTEMS Source Builder source
+tree. Public projects are included in the main RTEMS Source Builder such
+as RTEMS.
+
+You can also add your own ``patches`` directory next to your
+``config`` directory as the ``%patch`` command searches the
+``_patchdir`` macro variable and it is by default set to
+``%{\_topdir}/patches:%{\_sbdir}/patches``.
+
+The ``source-builder/config`` directory provides generic scripts for building
+various tools. You can specialise these in your private configurations to make
+use of them. If you add new generic configurations please contribute them back
+to the project
+
+Bare Metal
+~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The RSB contains a 'bare' configuration tree and you can use this to add
+packages you use on the hosts. For example 'qemu' is supported on a range of
+hosts. RTEMS tools live in the ``rtems/config`` directory tree. RTEMS packages
+include tools for use on your host computer as well as packages you can build
+and run on RTEMS.
+
+The 'bare metal' support for GNU Tool chains. An example is the 'lang/gcc491'
+build set. You need to provide a target via the command line '--target'
+option and this is in the standard 2 or 3 tuple form. For example for an ARM
+compiler you would use 'arm-eabi' or 'arm-eabihf', and for SPARC you would
+use 'sparc-elf'.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ cd rtems-source-builder/bare
+ $../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=log_arm_eabihf \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/bare --target=arm-eabihf lang/gcc491
+ RTEMS Source Builder - Set Builder, v0.3.0
+ Build Set: lang/gcc491
+ config: devel/expat-2.1.0-1.cfg
+ package: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-apple-darwin13.2.0-1
+ building: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-apple-darwin13.2.0-1
+ config: devel/binutils-2.24-1.cfg
+ package: arm-eabihf-binutils-2.24-1
+ building: arm-eabihf-binutils-2.24-1
+ config: devel/gcc-4.9.1-newlib-2.1.0-1.cfg
+ package: arm-eabihf-gcc-4.9.1-newlib-2.1.0-1
+ building: arm-eabihf-gcc-4.9.1-newlib-2.1.0-1
+ config: devel/gdb-7.7-1.cfg
+ package: arm-eabihf-gdb-7.7-1
+ building: arm-eabihf-gdb-7.7-1
+ installing: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-apple-darwin13.2.0-1 -> /Users/chris/development/bare
+ installing: arm-eabihf-binutils-2.24-1 -> /Users/chris/development/bare
+ installing: arm-eabihf-gcc-4.9.1-newlib-2.1.0-1 -> /Users/chris/development/bare
+ installing: arm-eabihf-gdb-7.7-1 -> /Users/chris/development/bare
+ cleaning: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-apple-darwin13.2.0-1
+ cleaning: arm-eabihf-binutils-2.24-1
+ cleaning: arm-eabihf-gcc-4.9.1-newlib-2.1.0-1
+ cleaning: arm-eabihf-gdb-7.7-1
+
+RTEMS
+~~~~~
+
+The RTEMS Configurations found in the 'rtems' directory. The configurations are
+grouped by RTEMS version. In RTEMS the tools are specific to a specific version
+because of variations between Newlib and RTEMS. Restructuring in RTEMS and
+Newlib sometimes moves *libc* functionality between these two parts and this
+makes existing tools incompatible with RTEMS.
+
+RTEMS allows architectures to have different tool versions and patches. The
+large number of architectures RTEMS supports can make it difficult to get a
+common stable version of all the packages. An architecture may require a recent
+GCC because an existing bug has been fixed, however the more recent version may
+have a bug in other architecture. Architecture specific patches should be
+limited to the architecture it relates to. The patch may fix a problem on the
+effect architecture however it could introduce a problem in another
+architecture. Limit exposure limits any possible crosstalk between
+architectures.
+
+RTEMS supports *stable* and *unstable*. Stable configurations are fixed while
+unstable configurations are supporting using snapshots of user macros and
+reference release candidates or source extracted directly from version
+control. The stable build sets are referenced as ``<version>/rtems-<arch>`` and
+include ``autoconf`` and ``automake``.
+
+If you are building a released version of RTEMS the release RTEMS tar file will
+be downloaded and built as part of the build process. If you are building a
+tool set for use with the development branch of RTEMS, the development branch
+will be cloned directly from the RTEMS GIT repository and built.
+
+When building RTEMS within the RTEMS Source Builder it needs a suitable working
+``autoconf`` and ``automake``. These packages need to built and installed in their
+prefix in order for them to work. The RTEMS Source Builder installs all
+packages only after they have been built so if you host does not have a
+recent enough version of ``autoconf`` and ``automake`` you first need to build them
+and install them then build your tool set. The commands are:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=l-4.11-at.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 4.11/rtems-autotools
+ $ export PATH=~/development/rtems/4.11/bin:$PATH <1>
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=l-4.11-sparc.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 4.11/rtems-sparc
+
+- *<1>* Setting the path.
+
+TIP: If this is your first time building the tools and RTEMS it pays to add the
+``--dry-run`` option. This will run through all the configuration files and if
+any checks fail you will see this quickly rather than waiting for until the
+build fails a check.
+
+To build snapshots for testing purposes you use the available macro maps
+passing them on the command line using the ``--macros`` option. For RTEMS these
+are held in ``config/snapshots`` directory. The following builds *newlib* from
+CVS:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=l-4.11-sparc.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 \
+ --macros=snapshots/newlib-head.mc \
+ 4.11/rtems-sparc
+
+and the following uses the version control heads for *binutils*, *gcc*,
+*newlib*, *gdb* and *RTEMS*:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=l-heads-sparc.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11-head \
+ --macros=snapshots/binutils-gcc-newlib-gdb-head.mc \
+ 4.11/rtems-sparc
+
+Patches
+~~~~~~~
+
+Packages being built by the RSB need patches from time to time and the RSB
+supports patching upstream packages. The patches are held in a seperate
+directory called ``patches`` relative to the configuration directory you are
+building. For example ``%{\_topdir}/patches:%{\_sbdir}/patches``. Patches are
+declared in the configuration files in a similar manner to the package's source
+so please refer to the ``%source`` documentation. Patches, like the source, are
+to be made publically available for configurations that live in the RSB package
+and are downloaded on demand.
+
+If a package has a patch management tool it is recommended you reference the
+package's patch management tools directly. If the RSB does not support the
+specific patch manage tool please contact the mailing list to see if support
+can be added.
+
+Patches for packages developed by the RTEMS project can be placed in the RTEMS
+Tools Git repository. The ``tools`` directory in the repository has various
+places a patch can live. The tree is broken down in RTEMS releases and then
+tools within that release. If the package is not specific to any release the
+patch can be added closer to the top under the package's name. Patches to fix
+specific tool related issues for a specific architecture should be grouped
+under the specific architecture and only applied when building that
+architecture avoiding a patch breaking an uneffected architecture.
+
+Patches in the RTEMS Tools repository need to be submitted to the upstream
+project. It should not be a clearing house for patches that will not be
+accepted upstream.
+
+Patches are added to a component's name and in the ``%prep:`` section the
+patches can be set up, meaning they are applied to source. The patches
+are applied in the order they are added. If there is a dependency make
+sure you order the patches correctly when you add them. You can add any
+number of patches and the RSB will handle them efficently.
+
+Patches can have options. These are added before the patch URL. If no options
+are provided the patch's setup default options are used.
+
+Patches can be declared in build set up files.
+
+This examples shows how to declare a patch for gdb in the ``lm32`` architecture:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %patch add <1> gdb <2> %{rtems_gdb_patches}/lm32/gdb-sim-lm32uart.diff <3>
+
+- *<1>* The patch's ``add`` command.
+
+- *<2>* The group of patches this patch belongs too.
+
+- *<3>* The patch's URL. It is downloaded from here.
+
+Patches require a checksum to avoid a warning. The ``%hash`` directive can be
+used to add a checksum for a patch that is used to verify the patch:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %hash md5 <1> gdb-sim-lm32uart.diff <2> 77d070878112783292461bd6e7db17fb <3>
+
+- *<1>* The type of checksum, in the case an MD5 hash.
+
+- *<2>* The patch file the checksum is for.
+
+- *<3>* The MD5 hash.
+
+The patches are applied when a patch ``setup`` command is issued in the
+``%prep:`` section. All patches in the group are applied. To apply the
+GDB patch above use:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %patch setup <1> gdb <2> -p1 <3>
+
+- *<1>* The patch's ``setup`` command.
+
+- *<2>* The group of patches to apply.
+
+- *<3>* The patch group's default options. If no option is given with
+ the patch these options are used.
+
+Architecture specific patches live in the architecture build set file isolating
+the patch to that specific architecture. If a patch is common to a tool it
+resides in the RTEMS tools configuration file. Do not place patches for tools
+in the ``source-builder/config`` template configuration files.
+
+To test a patch simply copy it to your local ``patches`` directory. The RSB will
+see the patch is present and will not attempt to download it. Once you are
+happy with the patch submit it to the project and a core developer will review
+it and add it to the RTEMS Tools git repository.
+For example, to test a local patch for newlib, add the following two lines to
+the .cfg file in ``rtems/config/tools/`` that is included by the bset you use:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %patch add newlib file://0001-this-is-a-newlib-patch.patch <1>
+ %hash md5 0001-this-is-a-newlib-patch.diff 77d070878112783292461bd6e7db17fb <2>
+
+- *<1>* The diff file prepended with ``file://`` to tell RSB this is a
+ local file.
+
+- *<2>* The output from md5sum on the diff file.
+
+Cross and Canadian Cross Building
+#################################
+
+Cross building and Canadian Cross building is the process of building on one
+machine an executable that runs on another machine. An example is building a
+set of RTEMS tools on Linux to run on Windows. The RSB supports cross building
+and Canadian cross building.
+
+This sections details how to the RSB to cross and Canadian cross build.
+
+Cross Building
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Cross building is where the _build_ machine and _host_ are different. The
+_build_ machine runs the RSB and the _host_ machine is where the output from
+the build runs. An example is building a package such as NTP for RTEMS on your
+development machine.
+
+To build the NTP package for RTEMS you enter the RSB command:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder \
+ --log=log_ntp_arm.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 <1> \
+ --host=arm-rtems4.11 <2> \
+ --with-rtems-bsp=xilinx_zynq_zc706 <3> \
+ 4.11/net/ntp
+
+- *<1>* The tools and the RTEMS BSP are installed under the same prefix.
+
+- *<2>* The ``--host`` command is the RTEMS architecture and version.
+
+- *<3>* The BSP is built and installed in the prefix. The arhcitecture must
+ match the ``--host`` architecture.
+
+.. note: Installing Into Different Directories
+ TIP: If you install BSPs into a different path to the prefix use the
+ ``--with-tools`` option to specify the path to the tools. Do not add the 'bin'
+ directory at the end of the path.
+
+Canadian Cross Building
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+A Canadian cross builds are where the *build*, *host* and *target* machines all
+differ. For example building an RTEMS compiler for an ARM processor that runs
+on Windows is built using a Linux machine. The process is controlled by setting
+the build triplet to the host you are building, the host triplet to the host
+the tools will run on and the target to the RTEMS architecture you require. The
+tools needed by the RSB are:
+
+* Build host C and C++ compiler
+* Host C and C++ cross compiler
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder requires you provide the build host C and C++
+compiler and the final host C and C++ cross-compiler. The RSB will build the
+build host RTEMS compiler and the final host RTEMS C and C++ compiler, the
+output of this process.
+
+The Host C and C++ compiler is a cross-compiler that builds executables for
+the host you want the tools for. You need to provide these tools. For Windows a
+number of Unix operating systems provide MinGW tool sets as packages.
+
+The RSB will build an RTEMS tool set for the build host. This is needed when
+building the final host's RTEMS compiler as it needs to build RTEMS runtime
+code such as *libc* on the build host.
+
+TIP: Make sure the host's cross-compiler tools are in your path before run the
+RSB build command.
+
+TIP: Canadian Cross built tools will not run on the machine being used to build
+them so you should provide the ``--bset-tar-files`` and ``--no-install``
+options. The option to not install the files lets you provide a prefix that
+does not exist or you cannot access.
+
+To perform a cross build add ``--host=`` to the command line. For example
+to build a MinGW tool set on FreeBSD for Windows add ``--host=mingw32``
+if the cross compiler is ``mingw32-gcc``:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --host=mingw32 \
+ --log=l-mingw32-4.11-sparc.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 \
+ 4.11/rtems-sparc
+
+If you are on a Linux Fedora build host with the MinGW packages installed the
+command line is:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --host=i686-w64-mingw32 \
+ --log=l-mingw32-4.11-sparc.txt \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 \
+ 4.11/rtems-sparc
+
+RTEMS 3rd Party Packages
+########################
+
+This section describes how to build and add an RTEMS 3rd party package to the
+RSB.
+
+A 3rd party package is a library or software package built to run on RTEMS,
+examples are NTP, Net-Snmp, libjpeg or Python. These pieces of software can be
+used to help build RTEMS applications. The package is built for a specific
+BSP and so requires a working RTEMS tool chain and an installed RTEMS Board
+Support Package (BSP).
+
+The RSB support for building 3rd part packages is based around the pkconfig
+files (PC) installed with the BSP. The pkgconfig support in RTEMS is considered
+experimental and can have some issues for some BSPs. This issue is rooted deep
+in the RTEMS build system. If you have any issues with this support please ask
+on the RTEMS developers mailing list.
+
+Building
+~~~~~~~~
+
+To build a package you need to have a suitable RTEMS tool chain and RTEMS BSP
+installed. The set builder command line requires you provide the tools path,
+the RTEMS host, and the prefix path to the installed RTEMS BSP. The prefix
+needs to be the same as the prefix used to build RTEMS.
+
+To build Net-SNMP the command is:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ cd rtems-source-builder/rtems
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=log_sis_net_snmp \
+ --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/bsps/4.11 \
+ --with-tools=$HOME/development/rtems/4.11 \
+ --host=sparc-rtems4.11 --with-rtems-bsp=sis 4.11/net-mgmt/net-snmp
+ RTEMS Source Builder - Set Builder, v0.3.0
+ Build Set: 4.11/net-mgmt/net-snmp
+ config: net-mgmt/net-snmp-5.7.2.1-1.cfg
+ package: net-snmp-5.7.2.1-sparc-rtems4.11-1
+ building: net-snmp-5.7.2.1-sparc-rtems4.11-1
+ installing: net-snmp-5.7.2.1-sparc-rtems4.11-1 -> /Users/chris/development/rtems/bsps/4.11
+ cleaning: net-snmp-5.7.2.1-sparc-rtems4.11-1
+ Build Set: Time 0:01:10.651926
+
+Adding
+~~~~~~
+
+Adding a package requires you first build it manually by downloading the source
+for the package and building it for RTEMS using the command line of a standard
+shell. If the package has not been ported to RTEMS you will need to port it and
+this may require you asking questions on the package's user or development
+support lists as well as RTEMS's developers list. Your porting effort may end
+up with a patch. RTEMS requires a patch be submitted upstream to the project's
+community as well as RTEMS so it can be added to the RTEMS Tools git
+repository. A patch in the RTEMS Tools git reposiitory can then be referenced
+by an RSB configuration file.
+
+A package may create executables, for example NTP normally creates
+executables such as ``ntdp``, ``ntpupdate``, or ``ntpdc``. These
+executables can be useful when testing the package however they are
+of limited use by RTEMS users because they cannot be directly linked
+into a user application. Users need to link to the functions in these
+executables or even the executable as a function placed in libraries. If
+the package does not export the code in a suitable manner please contact
+the project's commuinity and see if you can work them to provide a way for
+the code to be exported. This may be difficult because exporting internal
+headers and functions opens the project up to API compatibility issues
+they did not have before. In the simplest case attempting to get the
+code into a static library with a single call entry point exported in a
+header would give RTEMS user's access to the package's main functionality.
+
+A package requires 3 files to be created:
+
+* The first file is the RTEMS build set file and it resides in the
+ ``$$rtems/config/%{rtems_version}$$`` path in a directory tree based on the
+ FreeBSD ports collection. For the NTP package and RTEMS 4.11 this is
+ ``rtems/config/4.11/net/ntp.bset``. If you do not know the FreeBSD port path
+ for the package you are adding please ask. The build set file references a
+ specific configuration file therefore linking the RTEMS version to a specific
+ version of the package you are adding. Updating the package to a new version
+ requires changing the build set to the new configuration file.
+
+* The second file is an RTEMS version specific configuration file
+ and it includes the RSB RTEMS BSP support. These configuration
+ files reside in the ``rtems/config`` tree again under the FreeBSD
+ port's path name. For example the NTP package is found in the ``net``
+ directory of the FreeBSD ports tree so the NTP configuration path is
+ ``$$rtems/config/net/ntp-4.2.6p5-1.cfg$$`` for that specific version. The
+ configuration file name typically provides version specific references
+ and the RTEMS build set file references a specific version. This
+ configuration file references the build configuration file held in the
+ common configuration file tree.
+
+* The build configuration. This is a common script that builds the package. It
+ resides in the ``source-builder/config`` directory and typically has the
+ packages's name with the major version number. If the build script does not
+ change for each major version number a *common* base script can be created
+ and included by each major version configuration script. The *gcc* compiler
+ configuration is an example. This approach lets you branch a version if
+ something changes that is not backwards compatible. It is important to keep
+ existing versions building. The build configuration should be able to build a
+ package for the build host as well as RTEMS as the RSB abstracts the RTEMS
+ specific parts. See <<H1,``_Configuration_``>> for more details.
+
+BSP Support
+~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The RSB provides support to help build packages for RTEMS. RTEMS applications
+can be viewed as statically linked executables operating in a single address
+space. As a result only the static libraries a package builds are required and
+these libraries need to be ABI compatible with the RTEMS kernel and application
+code meaning compiler ABI flags cannot be mixed when building code. The 3rd
+party package need to use the same compiler flags as the BSP used to build
+RTEMS.
+
+.. comment [TIP]
+
+.. note::
+
+ RTEMS's dynamic loading support does not use the standard shared library
+ support found in Unix and the ELF standard. RTEMS's loader uses static
+ libraries and the runtime link editor performs a similar function to a host
+ based static linker. RTEMS will only reference static libraries even
+ if dynamic libraries are created and installed.
+
+The RSB provides the configuration file ``rtems/config/rtems-bsp.cfg``
+to support building 3rd party packages and you need to include this
+file in your RTEMS version specific configuration file. For example the
+Net-SNMP configuration file:
+
+.rtems/config/net-mgmt/net-snmp-5.7.2.1-1.cfg
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ #
+ # NetSNMP 5.7.2.1
+ #
+
+ %if %{release} == %{nil}
+ %define release 1 <1>
+ %endif
+
+ %include %{_configdir}/rtems-bsp.cfg <2>
+
+ #
+ # NetSNMP Version
+ #
+ %define net_snmp_version 5.7.2.1 <3>
+
+ #
+ # We need some special flags to build this version.
+ #
+ %define net_snmp_cflags <4> -DNETSNMP_CAN_USE_SYSCTL=1 -DARP_SCAN_FOUR_ARGUMENTS=1 -DINP_IPV6=0
+
+ #
+ # Patch for RTEMS support.
+ #
+ %patch add net-snmp %{rtems_git_tools}/net-snmp/rtems-net-snmp-5.7.2.1-20140623.patch <5>
+
+ #
+ # NetSNMP Build configuration
+ #
+ %include %{_configdir}/net-snmp-5-1.cfg <6>
+
+- *<1>* The release number.
+
+- *<2>* Include the RSB RTEMS BSP support.
+
+- *<3>* The Net-SNMP package's version.
+
+- *<4>* Add specific CFLAGS to the build process. See the
+ ``net-snmp-5.7.2.1-1.cfg`` for details.
+
+- *<5>* The RTEMS Net-SNMP patch downloaded from the RTEMS Tools git repo.
+
+- *<6>* The Net-SNMP standard build configuration.
+
+The RSB RTEMS BSP support file ``rtems/config/rtems-bsp.cfg`` checks
+to make sure standard command line options are provided. These include
+``--host`` and ``--with-rtems-bsp``. If the ``--with-tools`` command
+line option is not given the ``${\_prefix}`` is used.
+
+.rtems/config/rtems-bsp.cfg
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %if %{_host} == %{nil} <1>
+ %error No RTEMS target specified: --host=host
+ %endif
+
+ %ifn %{defined with_rtems_bsp} <2>
+ %error No RTEMS BSP specified: --with-rtems-bsp=bsp
+ %endif
+
+ %ifn %{defined with_tools} <3>
+ %define with_tools %{_prefix}
+ %endif
+
+ #
+ # Set the path to the tools.
+ #
+ %{path prepend %{with_tools}/bin} <4>
+
+- *<1>* Check the host has been set.
+
+- *<2>* Check a BSP has been specified.
+
+- *<3>* If no tools path has been provided assume they are under the
+ %{\_prefix}.
+
+- *<4>* Add the tools ``bin`` path to the system path.
+
+RTEMS exports the build flags used in pkgconfig (.pc) files and the RSB can
+read and manage them even when there is no pkgconfig support installed on your
+build machine. Using this support we can obtain a BSP's configuration and set
+some standard macros variables:
+
+.rtems/config/rtems-bsp.cfg
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %{pkgconfig prefix %{_prefix}/lib/pkgconfig} <1>
+ %{pkgconfig crosscompile yes} <2>
+ %{pkgconfig filter-flags yes} <3>
+
+ #
+ # The RTEMS BSP Flags
+ #
+ %define rtems_bsp %{with_rtems_bsp}
+ %define rtems_bsp_ccflags %{pkgconfig ccflags %{_host}-%{rtems_bsp}} <4>
+ %define rtems_bsp_cflags %{pkgconfig cflags %{_host}-%{rtems_bsp}}
+ %define rtems_bsp_ldflags %{pkgconfig ldflags %{_host}-%{rtems_bsp}}
+ %define rtems_bsp_libs %{pkgconfig libs %{_host}-%{rtems_bsp}}
+
+- *<1>* Set the path to the BSP's pkgconfig file.
+
+- *<2>* Let pkgconfig know this is a cross-compile build.
+
+- *<3>* Filter flags such as warnings. Warning flags are specific to a package.
+
+- *<4>* Ask pkgconfig for the various items we require.
+
+
+The flags obtain by pkgconfig and given a ``rtems_bsp_`` prefix and we uses these
+to set the RSB host support CFLAGS, LDFLAGS and LIBS flags. When we build a 3rd
+party library your host computer is the _build_ machine and RTEMS is the _host_
+machine therefore we set the ``host`` variables:
+
+.rtems/config/rtems-bsp.cfg
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %define host_cflags %{rtems_bsp_cflags}
+ %define host_ldflags %{rtems_bsp_ldflags}
+ %define host_libs %{rtems_bsp_libs}
+
+
+Finally we provide all the paths you may require when configuring a
+package. Packages by default consider the ``_prefix`` the base and install
+various files under this tree. The package you are building is specific to a
+BSP and so needs to install into the specific BSP path under the
+``_prefix``. This allows more than BSP build of this package to be install under
+the same ``_prefix`` at the same time:
+
+.rtems/config/rtems-bsp.cfg
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %define rtems_bsp_prefix %{_prefix}/%{_host}/%{rtems_bsp} <1>
+ %define _exec_prefix %{rtems_bsp_prefix}
+ %define _bindir %{_exec_prefix}/bin
+ %define _sbindir %{_exec_prefix}/sbin
+ %define _libexecdir %{_exec_prefix}/libexec
+ %define _datarootdir %{_exec_prefix}/share
+ %define _datadir %{_datarootdir}
+ %define _sysconfdir %{_exec_prefix}/etc
+ %define _sharedstatedir %{_exec_prefix}/com
+ %define _localstatedir %{_exec_prefix}/var
+ %define _includedir %{_libdir}/include
+ %define _lib lib
+ %define _libdir %{_exec_prefix}/%{_lib}
+ %define _libexecdir %{_exec_prefix}/libexec
+ %define _mandir %{_datarootdir}/man
+ %define _infodir %{_datarootdir}/info
+ %define _localedir %{_datarootdir}/locale
+ %define _localedir %{_datadir}/locale
+ %define _localstatedir %{_exec_prefix}/var
+
+- *<1>* The path to the BSP.
+
+When you configure a package you can reference these paths and the RSB will
+provide sensible default or in this case map them to the BSP:
+
+.source-builder/config/ntp-4-1.cfg
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ ../${source_dir_ntp}/configure \ <1>
+ --host=%{_host} \
+ --prefix=%{_prefix} \
+ --bindir=%{_bindir} \
+ --exec_prefix=%{_exec_prefix} \
+ --includedir=%{_includedir} \
+ --libdir=%{_libdir} \
+ --libexecdir=%{_libexecdir} \
+ --mandir=%{_mandir} \
+ --infodir=%{_infodir} \
+ --datadir=%{_datadir} \
+ --disable-ipv6 \
+ --disable-HOPFPCI
+
+- *<1>* The configure command for NTP.
+
+RTEMS BSP Configuration
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+To build a package for RTEMS you need to build it with the matching BSP
+configuration. A BSP can be built with specific flags that require all code
+being used needs to be built with the same flags.
+
+
+.. comment [[H1]]
+
+Configuration
+#############
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder has two types of configuration data:
+
+* Build Sets
+
+* Package Build Configurations
+
+By default these files can be located in two separate directories and
+searched. The first directory is ``config`` in your current working
+directory (``_topdir``) and the second is ``config`` located in the base
+directory of the RTEMS Source Builder command you run (``_sbdir``). The
+RTEMS directory ``rtems``` located at the top of the RTEMS Source
+Builder source code is an example of a specific build configuration
+directory. You can create custom or private build configurations and
+if you run the RTEMS Source Builder command from that directory your
+configurations will be used.
+
+[[X1]] The configuration search path is a macro variable and is reference as
+``%\{_configdir\}``. It's default is defined as:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ _configdir : dir optional<2> %{_topdir}/config:%{_sbdir}/config <1>
+
+- *<1>* The ``_topdir`` is the directory you run the command from and
+ ``_sbdir`` is the location of the RTEMS Source Builder command.
+
+- *<2>* A macro definition in a macro file has 4 fields, the label, type,
+ constraint and the definition.
+
+Build set files have the file extension ``.bset`` and the package build
+configuration files have the file extension of ``.cfg``. The ``sb-set-builder``
+command will search for *build sets* and the ``sb-builder`` commands works with
+package build configuration files.
+
+Both types of configuration files use the \'#' character as a comment
+character. Anything after this character on the line is ignored. There is no
+block comment.
+
+Source and Patches
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder provides a flexible way to manage source. Source and
+patches are declare in configurations file using the ``source`` and ``patch``
+directives. These are a single line containing a Universal Resource Location or
+URL and can contain macros and shell expansions. The <<_prep,%prep>> section
+details the source and patch directives
+
+The URL can reference remote and local source and patch resources. The
+following schemes are provided:
+
+'http':: Remote access using the HTTP protocol.
+'https':: Remote access using the Secure HTTP protocol.
+'ftp':: Remote access using the FTP protocol.
+'git':: Remote access to a GIT repository.
+'cvs':: Remote access to a CVS repository.
+'pm':: Remote access to a patch management repository.
+'file':: Local access to an existing source directory.
+
+HTTP, HTTPS, and FTP
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+Remote access to TAR or ZIP files is provided using HTTP, HTTPS and FTP
+protocols. The full URL provided is used to access the remote file including
+any query components. The URL is parsed to extract the file component and the
+local source directory is checked for that file. If the file is located locally
+the remote file is not downloaded. Currently no other checks are made. If a
+download fails you need to manually remove the file from the source directory
+and start the build process again.
+
+The URL can contain macros. These are expanded before issuing the request to
+download the file. The standard GNU GCC compiler source URL is:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source set<1> gcc<2> ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gcc/gcc-%{gcc_version}/gcc-%{gcc_version}.tar.bz2
+
+- *<1>* The ``%source`` command's set command sets the source. The first
+ is set and following sets are ignored.
+
+- *<2>* The source is part of the ``gcc`` group.
+
+The type of compression is automatically detected from the file extension. The
+supported compression formats are:
+
+'gz':: GNU ZIP
+'bzip2':: BZIP2
+'zip':: ZIP
+'xy':: XY
+
+The output of the decompression tool is feed to the standard ``tar`` utility if
+not a ZIP file and unpacked into the build directory. ZIP files are unpacked by
+the decompression tool and all other files must be in the tar file format.
+
+The ``%source`` directive typically supports a single source file tar or
+zip file. The ``set`` command is used to set the URL for a specific source
+group. The first set command encoutner is registered and any further set
+commands are ignored. This allows you to define a base standard source
+location and override it in build and architecture specific files. You
+can also add extra source files to a group. This is typically done when a
+collection of source is broken down in a number of smaller files and you
+require the full package. The source's ``setup`` command must reide in
+the ``%prep:`` section and it unpacks the source code ready to be built.
+
+If the source URL references the GitHub API server 'https://api.github.com/' a
+tarball of the specified version is download. For example the URL for the
+STLINK project on GitHub and version is:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %define stlink_version 3494c11
+ %source set stlink https://api.github.com/repos/texane/stlink/texane-stlink-%{stlink_version}.tar.gz
+
+
+GIT
+^^^
+
+A GIT repository can be cloned and used as source. The GIT repository resides
+in the 'source' directory under the ``git`` directory. You can edit, update and
+use the repository as you normally do and the results will used to build the
+tools. This allows you to prepare and test patches in the build environment the
+tools are built in. The GIT URL only supports the GIT protocol. You can control
+the repository via the URL by appending options and arguments to the GIT
+path. The options are delimited by ``?`` and option arguments are delimited from
+the options with ``=``. The options are:
+
+``protocol``:: Use a specific protocol. The supported values are *ssh*, *git*,
+*http*, *https*, *ftp*, *ftps*, *rsync*, and *none*.
+``branch``:: Checkout the specified branch.
+``pull``:: Perform a pull to update the repository.
+``fetch``:: Perform a fetch to get any remote updates.
+``reset``:: Reset the repository. Useful to remove any local changes. You can
+pass the ``hard`` argument to force a hard reset.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source set gcc git://gcc.gnu.org/git/gcc.git?branch=gcc-4_7-branch?reset=hard
+
+This will clone the GCC git repository and checkout the 4.7-branch and perform
+a hard reset. You can select specific branches and apply patches. The
+repository is cleaned up before each build to avoid various version control
+errors that can arise.
+
+The protocol option lets you set a specific protocol. The 'git://' prefix used
+by the RSB to select a git repository can be removed using *none* or replaced
+with one of the standard git protcols.
+
+CVS
+^^^
+
+A CVS repository can be checked out. CVS is more complex than GIT to handle
+because of the modules support. This can effect the paths the source ends up
+in. The CVS URL only supports the CVS protocol. You can control the repository
+via the URL by appending options and arguments to the CVS path. The options are
+delimited by ``?`` and option arguments are delimited from the options with
+``=``. The options are:
+
+``module``:: The module to checkout.
+``src-prefix``:: The path into the source where the module starts.
+``tag``:: The CVS tag to checkout.
+``date``:: The CVS date to checkout.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source set newlib cvs://pserver:anoncvs@sourceware.org/cvs/src?module=newlib?src-prefix=src
+
+Macros and Defaults
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder uses tables of *macros* read in when the tool
+runs. The initial global set of macros is called the *defaults*. These values
+are read from a file called ``defaults.mc`` and modified to suite your host. This
+host specific adaption lets the Source Builder handle differences in the build
+hosts.
+
+Build set and configuration files can define new values updating and extending
+the global macro table. For example builds are given a release number. This is
+typically a single number at the end of the package name. For example:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %define release 1
+
+Once defined if can be accessed in a build set or package configuration file
+with:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %{release}
+
+The ``sb-defaults`` command lists the defaults for your host. I will not include
+the output of this command because of its size.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-defaults
+
+A nested build set is given a separate copy of the global macro maps. Changes
+in one change set are not seen in other build sets. That same happens with
+configuration files unless inline includes are used. Inline includes are seen
+as part of the same build set and configuration and changes are global to that
+build set and configuration.
+
+Macro Maps and Files
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+Macros are read in from files when the tool starts. The default settings are
+read from the defaults macro file called ``defaults.mc`` located in the top level
+RTEMS Source Builder command directory. User macros can be read in at start up
+by using the ``--macros`` command line option.
+
+The format for a macro in macro files is:
+
+.. comment [options="header,compact",width="50%",cols="15%,15%,15%,55%"]
+|=================================
+| Name | Type | Attribute | String
+|=================================
+
+where 'Name' is a case insensitive macro name, the 'Type' field is:
+
+[horizontal]
+``none``:: Nothing, ignore.
+``dir``:: A directory path.
+``exe``:: An executable path.
+``triplet``:: A GNU style architecture, platform, operating system string.
+
+the 'Attribute' field is:
+
+[horizontal]
+``none``:: Nothing, ignore
+``required``:: The host check must find the executable or path.
+``optional``:: The host check generates a warning if not found.
+``override``:: Only valid outside of the ``global`` map to indicate this macro
+ overrides the same one in the ``global`` map when the map containing
+ it is selected.
+``undefine``:: Only valid outside of the ``global`` map to undefine the macro if it
+ exists in the ``global`` map when the map containing it is
+ selected. The ``global`` map's macro is not visible but still
+ exists.
+
+and the 'String' field is a single or tripled multiline quoted string. The
+'String' can contain references to other macros. Macro that loop are not
+currently detected and will cause the tool to lock up.
+
+Maps are declared anywhere in the map using the map directive:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # Comments
+ [my-special-map] <1>
+ _host: none, override, 'abc-xyz'
+ multiline: none, override, '''First line,
+ second line,
+ and finally the last line'''
+
+- *<1>* The map is set to ``my-special-map``.
+
+Any macro defintions following a map declaration are placed in that map and the
+default map is ``global`` when loading a file. Maps are selected in configuration
+files by using the ``%select`` directive.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %select my-special-map
+
+Selecting a map means all requests for a macro first check the selected map and
+if present return that value else the ``global`` map is used. Any new macros or
+changes update only the ``global`` map. This may change in future releases so
+please make sure you use the ``override`` attribute.
+
+The macro files specificed on the command line are looked for in the
+``_configdir`` paths. See <<X1,``_configdir``>> variable for details. Included
+files need to add the ``%{_configdir}`` macro to the start of the file.
+
+Macro map files can include other macro map files using the ``%include``
+directive. The macro map to build *binutils*, *gcc*, *newlib*, *gdb* and
+*RTEMS* from version control heads is:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # <1>
+ # Build all tool parts from version control head.
+ #
+ %include %{_configdir}/snapshots/binutils-head.mc
+ %include %{_configdir}/snapshots/gcc-head.mc
+ %include %{_configdir}/snapshots/newlib-head.mc
+ %include %{_configdir}/snapshots/gdb-head.mc
+
+- *<1>* The file is ``config/snapshots/binutils-gcc-newlib-gdb-head.mc``.
+
+The macro map defaults to ``global`` at the start of each included file and the
+map setting of the macro file including the other macro files does not change.
+
+Personal Macros
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+When the tools start to run they will load personal macros. Personal macros are
+in the standard format for macros in a file. There are two places personal
+macros can be configured. The first is the environment variable
+``RSB_MACROS``. If present the macros from the file the environment variable
+points to are loaded. The second is a file called ``.rsb_macros`` in your home
+directory. You need to have the environment variable ``HOME`` defined for this
+work.
+
+Report Mailing
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The build reports can be mailed to a specific email address to logging and
+monitoring. Mailing requires a number of parameters to function. These are:
+
+* To mail address
+
+* From mail address
+
+* SMTP host
+
+.To Mail Address
+
+The ``to`` mail address is taken from the macro ``%{_mail_tools_to}`` and the
+default is *rtems-tooltestresults at rtems.org*. You can override the default
+with a personal or user macro file or via the command line option *--mail-to*.
+
+.From Mail Address
+
+The ``from`` mail address is taken from:
+
+* GIT configuration
+
+* User ``.mailrc`` file
+
+* Command line
+
+If you have configured an email and name in git it will be used used. If you do
+not a check is made for a ``.mailrc`` file. The environment variable *MAILRC* is
+used if present else your home directory is check. If found the file is scanned
+for the ``from`` setting:
+
+ set from="Foo Bar <foo@bar>"
+
+You can also support a from address on the command line with the *--mail-from*
+option.
+
+.SMTP Host
+
+The SMTP host is taken from the macro ``%{_mail_smtp_host}`` and the
+default is ``localhost``. You can override the default with a personal
+or user macro file or via the command line option *--smtp-host*.
+
+Build Set Files
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Build set files lets you list the packages in the build set you are defining
+and have a file extension of ``.bset``. Build sets can define macro variables,
+inline include other files and reference other build set or package
+configuration files.
+
+Defining macros is performed with the ``%define`` macro:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %define _target m32r-rtems4.11
+
+Inline including another file with the ``%include`` macro continues processing
+with the specified file returning to carry on from just after the include
+point.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %include rtems-4.11-base.bset
+
+This includes the RTEMS 4.11 base set of defines and checks. The configuration
+paths as defined by ``_configdir`` are scanned. The file extension is optional.
+
+You reference build set or package configuration files by placing the file name
+on a single line.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ tools/rtems-binutils-2.22-1
+
+The ``_configdir`` path is scanned for ``tools/rtems-binutils-2.22-1.bset`` or
+``tools/rtems-binutils-2.22-1.cfg``. Build set files take precedent over package
+configuration files. If ``tools/rtems-binutils-2.22-1`` is a build set a new
+instance of the build set processor is created and if the file is a package
+configuration the package is built with the package builder. This all happens
+once the build set file has finished being scanned.
+
+Configuration Control
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The RTEMS Souce Builder is designed to fit within most verification and
+validation processes. All of the RTEMS Source Builder is source code. The
+Python code is source and comes with a commercial friendly license. All
+configuration data is text and can be read or parsed with standard text based
+tools.
+
+File naming provides configuration management. A specific version of a package
+is captured in a specific set of configuration files. The top level
+configuration file referenced in a *build set* or passed to the +sb-builder+
+command relates to a specific configuration of the package being built. For
+example the RTEMS configuration file +rtems-gcc-4.7.2-newlib-2.0.0-1.cfg+
+creates an RTEMS GCC and Newlib package where the GCC version is 4.7.2, the
+Newlib version is 2.0.0, plus any RTEMS specific patches that related to this
+version. The configuration defines the version numbers of the various parts
+that make up this package:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %define gcc_version 4.7.2
+ %define newlib_version 2.0.0
+ %define mpfr_version 3.0.1
+ %define mpc_version 0.8.2
+ %define gmp_version 5.0.5
+
+The package build options, if there are any are also defined:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %define with_threads 1
+ %define with_plugin 0
+ %define with_iconv 1
+
+The generic configuration may provide defaults in case options are not
+specified. The patches this specific version of the package requires can be
+included:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ Patch0: gcc-4.7.2-rtems4.11-20121026.diff
+
+Finally including the GCC 4.7 configuration script:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %include %{_configdir}/gcc-4.7-1.cfg
+
+The +gcc-4.7-1.cfg+ file is a generic script to build a GCC 4.7 compiler with
+Newlib. It is not specific to RTEMS. A bare no operating system tool set can be
+built with this file.
+
+The +-1+ part of the file names is a revision. The GCC 4.7 script maybe revised
+to fix a problem and if this fix effects an existing script the file is copied
+and given a +-2+ revision number. Any dependent scripts referencing the earlier
+revision number will not be effected by the change. This locks down a specific
+configuration over time.
+
+Personal Configurations
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The RSB supports personal configurations. You can view the RTEMS support in the
++rtems+ directory as a private configuration tree that resides within the RSB
+source. There is also the +bare+ set of configurations. You can create your own
+configurations away from the RSB source tree yet use all that the RSB provides.
+
+To create a private configuration change to a suitable directory:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ cd ~/work
+ $ mkdir test
+ $ cd test
+ $ mkdir config
+
+and create a +config+ directory. Here you can add a new configuration or build
+set file. The section 'Adding New Configurations' details how to add a new
+confguration.
+
+New Configurations
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+This section describes how to add a new configuration to the RSB. We will add a
+configuration to build the Device Tree Compiler. The Device Tree Compiler or
+DTC is part of the Flattened Device Tree project and compiles Device Tree
+Source (DTS) files into Device Tree Blobs (DTB). DTB files can be loaded by
+operating systems and used to locate the various resources such as base
+addresses of devices or interrupt numbers allocated to devices. The Device Tree
+Compiler source code can be downloaded from http://www.jdl.com/software. The
+DTC is supported in the RSB and you can find the configuration files under the
++bare/config+ tree. I suggest you have a brief look over these files.
+
+Layering by Including
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+Configurations can be layered using the +%include+ directive. The user invokes
+the outer layers which include inner layers until all the required
+configuration is present and the package can be built. The outer layers can
+provide high level details such as the version and the release and the inner
+layers provide generic configuration details that do not change from one
+release to another. Macro variables are used to provide the specific
+configuration details.
+
+Configuration File Numbering
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+Configuration files have a number at the end. This is a release number for that
+configuration and it gives us the ability to track a specific configuration for
+a specific version. For example lets say the developers of the DTC package
+change the build system from a single makefile to autoconf and automake between
+version 1.3.0 and version 1.4.0. The configuration file used to build the
+package would change have to change. If we did not number the configuration
+files the ability to build 1.1.0, 1.2.0 or 1.3.0 would be lost if we update a
+common configuration file to build an autoconf and automake version. For
+version 1.2.0 the same build script can be used so we can share the same
+configuration file between version 1.1.0 and version 1.2.0. An update to any
+previous release lets us still build the package.
+
+Common Configuration Scripts
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+Common configuration scripts that are independent of version, platform and
+architecture are useful to everyone. These live in the Source Builder's
+configuration directory. Currently there are scripts to build binutils, expat,
+DTC, GCC, GDB and libusb. These files contain the recipes to build these
+package without the specific details of the versions or patches being
+built. They expect to be wrapped by a configuration file that ties the package
+to a specific version and optionally specific patches.
+
+DTC Example
+^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+We will be building the DTC for your host rather than a package for RTEMS. We
+will create a file called +source-builder/config/dtc-1-1.cfg+. This is a common
+script that can be used to build a specific version using a general recipe. The
+file name is 'dtc-1-1.cfg' where the 'cfg' extension indicates this is a
+configuration file. The first *1* says this is for the major release 1 of the
+package and the last *1* is the build configuration version.
+
+The file starts with some comments that detail the configuration. If there is
+anything unusual about the configuration it is a good idea to add something in
+the comments here. The comments are followed by a check for the release. In
+this case if a release is not provided a default of 1 is used.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ #
+ # DTC 1.x.x Version 1.
+ #
+ # This configuration file configure's, make's and install's DTC.
+ #
+
+ %if %{release} == %{nil}
+ %define release 1
+ %endif
+
+The next section defines some information about the package. It does not effect
+the build and is used to annotate the reports. It is recommended this
+information is kept updated and accurate.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ Name: dtc-%{dtc_version}-%{_host}-%{release}
+ Summary: Device Tree Compiler v%{dtc_version} for target %{_target} on host %{_host}
+ Version: %{dtc_version}
+ Release: %{release}
+ URL: http://www.jdl.com/software/
+ BuildRoot: %{_tmppath}/%{name}-root-%(%{__id_u} -n)
+
+The next section defines the source and any patches. In this case there is a
+single source package and it can be downloaded using the HTTP protocol. The RSB
+knows this is GZip'ped tar file. If more than one package package is needed add
+them increasing the index. The +gcc-4.8-1.cfg+ configuration contains examples
+of more than one source package as well as conditionally including source
+packages based on the outer configuration options.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ #
+ # Source
+ #
+ %source set dtc http://www.jdl.com/software/dtc-v%{dtc_version}.tgz
+ -------------------------------------------------------------
+
+The remainder of the script is broken in to the various phases of a build. They
+are:
+
+. Preperation
+. Bulding
+. Installing, and
+. Cleaning
+
+Preparation is the unpacking of the source, applying any patches as well as any
+package specific set ups. This part of the script is a standard Unix shell
+script. Be careful with the use of '%' and '$'. The RSB uses '%' while the
+shell scripts use '$'.
+
+A standard pattern you will observe is the saving of the build's top
+directory. This is used instead of changing into a subdirectory and then
+changing to the parent when finished. Some hosts will change in a subdirectory
+that is a link however changing to the parent does not change back to the
+parent of the link rather it changes to the parent of the target of the link
+and that is something the RSB nor you can track easily. The RSB configuration
+script's are a collection of various subtle issues so please ask if you are
+unsure why something is being done a particular way.
+
+The preparation phase will often include source and patch setup commands. Outer
+layers can set the source package and add patches as needed while being able to
+use a common recipe for the build. Users can override the standard build and
+supply a custom patch for testing using the user macro command line interface.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ #
+ # Prepare the source code.
+ #
+ %prep
+ build_top=$(pwd)
+
+ %source setup dtc -q -n dtc-v%{dtc_version}
+ %patch setup dtc -p1
+
+ cd ${build_top}
+
+The configuration file 'gcc-common-1.cfg' is a complex example of source
+preparation. It contains a number of source packages and patches and it
+combines these into a single source tree for building. It uses links to map
+source into the GCC source tree so GCC can be built using the *single source
+tree* method. It also shows how to fetch source code from version
+control. Newlib is taken directly from its CVS repository.
+
+Next is the building phase and for the DTC example this is simply a matter of
+running +make+. Note the use of the RSB macros for commands. In the case of
+'%{\__make}' it maps to the correct make for your host. In the case of BSD
+systems we need to use the GNU make and not the GNU make.
+
+If your package requires a configuration stage you need to run this before the
+make stage. Again the GCC common configuration file provides a detailed example.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %build
+ build_top=$(pwd)
+
+ cd dtc-v%{dtc_version}
+
+ %{build_build_flags}
+
+ %{__make} PREFIX=%{_prefix}
+
+ cd ${build_top}
+
+You can invoke make with the macro '%{?_smp_flags}' as a command line
+argument. This macro is controlled by the '--jobs' command line option and the
+host CPU detection support in the RSB. If you are on a multicore host you can
+increase the build speed using this macro. It also lets you disabled building on
+multicores to aid debugging when testing.
+
+Next is the install phase. This phase is a little more complex because you may
+be building a tar file and the end result of the build is never actually
+installed into the prefix on the build host and you may not even have
+permissions to perform a real install. Most packages install to the +prefix+
+and the prefix is typically supplied via the command to the RSB or the
+package's default is used. The default can vary depending on the host's
+operating system. To install to a path that is not the prefix the +DESTDIR+
+make variable is used. Most packages should honour the +DISTDIR+ make variables
+and you can typically specify it on the command line to make when invoking the
+install target. This results in the package being installed to a location that
+is not the prefix but one you can control. The RSB provides a shell variable
+called +SB_BUILD_ROOT+ you can use. In a build set where you are building a
+number of packages you can collect all the built packages in a single tree that
+is captured in the tar file.
+
+Also note the use of the macro +%{\__rmdir}+. The use of these macros allow the
+RSB to vary specific commands based on the host. This can help on hosts like
+Windows where bugs can effect the standard commands such as 'rm'. There are
+many many macros to help you. You can find these listed in the +defaults.mc+
+file and in the trace output. If you are new to creating and editing
+configurations learning these can take a little time.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %install
+ build_top=$(pwd)
+
+ %{__rmdir} -rf $SB_BUILD_ROOT
+
+ cd dtc-v%{dtc_version}
+ %{__make} DESTDIR=$SB_BUILD_ROOT PREFIX=%{_prefix} install
+
+ cd ${build_top}
+
+Finally there is an optional clean section. The RSB will run this section if
++--no-clean+ has not been provided on the command line. The RSB does clean up
+for you.
+
+Once we have the configuration files we can execute the build using the
+``sb-builder`` command. The command will perform the build and create a tar file
+in the +tar+ directory.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-builder --prefix=/usr/local \
+ --log=log_dtc devel/dtc-1.2.0
+ RTEMS Source Builder, Package Builder v0.2.0
+ config: devel/dtc-1.2.0
+ package: dtc-1.2.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ download: http://www.jdl.com/software/dtc-v1.2.0.tgz -> sources/dtc-v1.2.0.tgz
+ building: dtc-1.2.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ $ ls tar
+ dtc-1.2.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1.tar.bz2
+
+If you want to have the package installed automatically you need to create a
+build set. A build set can build one or more packages from their configurations
+at once to create a single package. For example the GNU tools is typically seen
+as binutils, GCC and GDB and a build set will build each of these packages and
+create a single build set tar file or install the tools on the host into the
+prefix path.
+
+The DTC build set file is called +dtc.bset+ and contains:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ #
+ # Build the DTC.
+ #
+
+ %define release 1
+
+ devel/dtc-1.2.0.cfg
+
+To build this you can use something similar to:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --prefix=/usr/local --log=log_dtc \
+ --trace --bset-tar-file --no-install dtc
+ RTEMS Source Builder - Set Builder, v0.2.0
+ Build Set: dtc
+ config: devel/dtc-1.2.0.cfg
+ package: dtc-1.2.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ building: dtc-1.2.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ tarball: tar/x86_64-freebsd9.1-dtc-set.tar.bz2
+ cleaning: dtc-1.2.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1
+ Build Set: Time 0:00:02.865758
+ $ ls tar
+ dtc-1.2.0-x86_64-freebsd9.1-1.tar.bz2 x86_64-freebsd9.1-dtc-set.tar.bz2
+
+The build is for a FreeBSD host and the prefix is for user installed
+packages. In this example I cannot let the source builder perform the install
+because I never run the RSB with root priviledges so a build set or bset tar
+file is created. This can then be installed using root privildges.
+
+The command also supplies the --trace option. The output in the log file will
+contian all the macros.
+
+Debugging
+^^^^^^^^^
+
+New configuration files require debugging. There are two types of
+debugging. The first is debugging RSB script bugs. The +--dry-run+ option is
+used here. Suppling this option will result in most of the RSB processing to be
+performed and suitable output placed in the log file. This with the +--trace+
+option should help you resolve any issues.
+
+The second type of bug to fix are related to the execution of one of
+phases. These are usually a mix of shell script bugs or package set up or
+configuration bugs. Here you can use any normal shell script type debug
+technique such as +set -x+ to output the commands or +echo+
+statements. Debugging package related issues may require you start a build with
+teh RSB and supply +--no-clean+ option and then locate the build directories
+and change directory into them and manually run commands until to figure what
+the package requires.
+
+Snapshot Testing
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+*TBD: This section needs to be updated once I sort out snapshot testing.*
+
+Testing of release canidates and snapshots is important to those helping
+maintain tool sets. The RTEMS Source Builder helps by providing a simple and
+flexible way to use existing build sets and configuration without needing to
+change them or creating new temporary build sets and configurations.
+
+The process uses snapshot macro files loaded via the command line option
+``--macros``. These files provide macros that override the standard build set and
+configuration file macros.
+
+Lets consider testing a GCC 4.7 snapshot for RTEMS 4.11. Lets assume the
+current RTEMS 4.11 tools reference GCC 4.7.3 with a patch as the stable tool
+set. We want to use a recent snapshot with no patches. In the
+``rtems/config/snapshots`` directoy create a file called ``gcc-4.7-snapshot.mc``
+containing:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ [gcc-4.7-snapshot]
+ GCC_Version: none, override, '4.7-20130413'
+ Source: none, override, 'http://mirrors.kernel.org/sources.redhat.com/gcc/
+ snapshots/%{gcc_version}/gcc-%{gcc_version}.tar.bz2'
+ Patch0: none, udefine, ''
+
+In the standard configuration file ``source-builder/config/gcc-4.7-1.cfg`` the
+map is selected with:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ #
+ # Select the GCC 4.7 Snapshot Macro Map
+ #
+ %select gcc-4.7-snapshot
+
+On the command line add ``--macros=snapshots/gcc-4.7-snapshot.mc`` and this
+snapshot will be built. With careful use of the ``--prefix`` option you can
+locate the tools in a specific directory and test them without needing to
+effect your production environment.
+
+Scripting
+~~~~~~~~~
+
+Configuration files specify how to build a package. Configuration files are
+scripts and have a +.cfg+ file extension. The script format is based loosely on
+the RPM spec file format however the use and purpose in this tool does not
+compare with the functionality and therefore the important features of the spec
+format RPM needs and uses.
+
+The script language is implemented in terms of macros. The built-in list is:
+
+- *%{}*: Macro expansion with conditional logic.
+
+- *%()*: Shell expansion.
+
+- *%prep*: The source preparation shell commands.
+
+- *%build*: The build shell commands.
+
+- *%install*: The package install shell commands.
+
+- *%clean*: The package clean shell commands.
+
+- *%include*: Inline include another configuration file.
+
+- *%name*: The name of the package.
+
+- *%summary*: A brief package description. Useful when reporting about a build.
+
+- *%release*: The package release. A number that is the release as built
+ by this tool.
+
+- *%version*: The package's version string.
+
+- *%buildarch*: The build architecture.
+
+- *%source*: Define a source code package. This macro has a number appended.
+
+- *%patch*: Define a patch. This macro has a is number appended.
+
+- *%hash*: Define a checksum for a source or patch file.
+
+- *%echo*: Print the following string as a message.
+
+- *%warning*: Print the following string as a warning and continue.
+
+- *%error*: Print the following string as an error and exit.
+
+- *%select*: Select the macro map. If there is no map nothing is reported.
+
+- *%define*: Define a macro. Macros cannot be redefined, you must first
+ undefine it.
+
+- *%undefine*: Undefine a macro.
+
+- *%if*: Start a conditional logic block that ends with a +%endif+.
+
+- *%ifn*: Inverted start of a conditional logic block.
+
+- *%ifarch*: Test the architecture against the following string.
+
+- *%ifnarch*: Inverted test of the architecture
+
+- *%ifos*: Test the host operating system.
+
+- *%else*: Start the *else* conditional logic block.
+
+- *%endfi*: End the conditional logic block.
+
+- *%bconf_with*: Test the build condition *with* setting. This is the
+ +--with-*+ command line option.
+
+- *%bconf_without*: Test the build condition *without* setting. This is
+ the +--without-*+ command line option.
+
+Expanding
+^^^^^^^^^
+
+A macro can be ``%{string}`` or the equivalent of ``%string``. The following macro
+expansions supported are:
+
+- ``%{string}``: Expand the 'string' replacing the entire macro text
+ with the text in the table for the entry 'string . For example if 'var'
+ is 'foo' then ``${var}`` would become ``foo``.
+
+- ``%{expand: string}``: Expand the 'string' and then use it as a
+ ````string'' to the macro expanding the macro. For example if *foo*
+ is set to 'bar' and 'bar' is set to 'foobar' then ``%{expand:foo}``
+ would result in ``foobar``. Shell expansion can also be used.
+
+- ``%{with string}``: Expand the macro to '1' if the macro
+ ``with_``'string' is defined else expand to *0*. Macros with the name
+ ``with_``'string' can be define with command line arguments to the RTEMS
+ Source Builder commands.
+
+- ``%{defined string}``: Expand the macro to '1' if a macro of name
+ 'string' is defined else expand to '0'.
+
+- ``%{?string: expression}``: Expand the macro to 'expression' if a
+ macro of name 'string' is defined else expand to ``%{nil}``.
+
+- ``%{!?string: expression}``: Expand the macro to 'expression' if a
+ macro of name 'string' is not defined. If the macro is define expand to
+ ``%{nil}``.
+
+- ``%(expression)``: Expand the macro to the result of running the
+ 'expression' in a host shell. It is assumed this is a Unix type shell. For
+ example ``%(whoami)`` will return your user name and ``%(date)`` will
+ return the current date string.
+
+%prep
+^^^^^
+
+The +%prep+ macro starts a block that continues until the next block macro. The
+*prep* or preparation block defines the setup of the package's source and is a
+mix of RTEMS Source Builder macros and shell scripting. The sequence is
+typically +%source+ macros for source, +%patch+ macros to patch the source
+mixed with some shell commands to correct any source issues.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ <1> <2> <3>
+%source setup gcc -q -c -T -n %{name}-%{version}
+
+- *<1>* The source group to set up.
+
+- *<2>* The source's name.
+
+- *<3>* The version of the source.
+
+The source set up are declared with the source +set+ and +add+ commands. For
+example:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source set gdb http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gdb/gdb-%{gdb_version}.tar.bz2
+
+This URL is the primary location of the GNU GDB source code and the RTEMS
+Source Builder can download the file from this location and by inspecting the
+file extension use +bzip2+ decompression with +tar+. When the +%prep+ section
+is processed a check of the local +source+ directory is made to see if the file
+has already been downloaded. If not found in the source cache directory the
+package is downloaded from the URL. You can append other base URLs via the
+command line option +--url+. This option accepts a comma delimited list of
+sites to try.
+
+You could optionally have a few source files that make up the package. For
+example GNU's GCC was a few tar files for a while and it is now a single tar
+file. Support for multiple source files can be conditionally implemented with
+the following scripting:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source set gcc ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gcc/gcc-%{gcc_version}/gcc-code-%{gcc_version}.tar.bz2
+ %source add gcc ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gcc/gcc-%{gcc_version}/gcc-g++-%{gcc_version}.tar.bz2
+ %source setup gcc -q -T -D -n gcc-%{gcc_version}
+
+Separate modules use separate source groups. The GNU GCC compiler for RTEMS
+uses Newlib, MPFR, MPC, and GMP source packages. You define the source with:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source set gcc ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gcc/gcc-%{gcc_version}/gcc-%{gcc_version}.tar.bz2
+ %source set newlib ftp://sourceware.org/pub/newlib/newlib-%{newlib_version}.tar.gz
+ %source set mpfr http://www.mpfr.org/mpfr-%{mpfr_version}/mpfr-%{mpfr_version}.tar.bz2
+ %source set mpc http://www.multiprecision.org/mpc/download/mpc-%{mpc_version}.tar.gz
+ %source set gmp ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gmp/gmp-%{gmp_version}.tar.bz2
+
+and set up with:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source setup gcc -q -n gcc-%{gcc_version}
+ %source setup newlib -q -D -n newlib-%{newlib_version}
+ %source setup mpfr -q -D -n mpfr-%{mpfr_version}
+ %source setup mpc -q -D -n mpc-%{mpc_version}
+ %source setup gmp -q -D -n gmp-%{gmp_version}
+
+Patching also occurs during the preparation stage. Patches are handled in a
+similar way to the source packages except you only +add+ patches. Patches are
+applied using the +setup+ command. The +setup+ command takes the default patch
+option. You can provide options with each patch by adding them as arguments
+before the patch URL. Patches with no options uses the +setup+ default.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %patch add gdb %{rtems_gdb_patches}/gdb-sim-arange-inline.diff
+ %patch add gdb -p0 <1> %{rtems_gdb_patches}/gdb-sim-cgen-inline.diff
+
+- *<1>* This patch has a custom option.
+
+To apply these patches:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %patch setup gdb -p1 <1>
+
+- *<1>* The default options.
+
+%build
+^^^^^^
+
+The +%build+ macro starts a block that continues until the next block
+macro. The build block is a series of shell commands that execute to build the
+package. It assumes all source code has been unpacked, patch and adjusted so
+the build will succeed.
+
+The following is an example take from the GutHub STLink project:
+
+NOTE: STLink is a JTAG debugging device for the ST ARM family of processors.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %build
+ export PATH="%{_bindir}:${PATH}" <1>
+
+ cd texane-stlink-%{stlink_version} <2>
+
+ ./autogen.sh <3>
+
+ %if "%{_build}" != "%{_host}"
+ CFLAGS_FOR_BUILD="-g -O2 -Wall" \ <4>
+ %endif
+ CPPFLAGS="-I $SB_TMPPREFIX/include/libusb-1.0" \ <5>
+ CFLAGS="$SB_OPT_FLAGS" \
+ LDFLAGS="-L $SB_TMPPREFIX/lib" \
+ ./configure \ <6>
+ --build=%{_build} --host=%{_host} \
+ --verbose \
+ --prefix=%{_prefix} --bindir=%{_bindir} \
+ --exec-prefix=%{_exec_prefix} \
+ --includedir=%{_includedir} --libdir=%{_libdir} \
+ --mandir=%{_mandir} --infodir=%{_infodir}
+
+ %{__make} %{?_smp_mflags} all <7>
+
+ cd ..
+
+- *<1>* Setup the PATH environment variable. This is not always needed.
+
+- *<2>* This package builds in the source tree so enter it.
+
+- *<3>* The package is actually checked directly out from the github
+ project and so it needs its autoconf and automake files generated.
+
+- *<4>* Flags for a cross-compiled build.
+
+- *<5>* Various settings passed to configure to customise the build. In
+ this example an include path is being set to the install point of
+ *libusb*. This package requires *libusb* is built before it.
+
+- *<6>* The +configure+ command. The RTEMS Source Builder provides
+ all the needed paths as macro variables. You just need to provide them
+ to +configure+.
+
+- *<7>* Running make. Do not use +make+ directly, use the RTEMS Source
+ Builder's defined value. This value is specific to the host. A large
+ number of packages need GNU make and on BSD systems this is +gmake+. You
+ can optionally add the SMP flags if the packages build system can
+ handle parallel building with multiple jobs. The +_smp_mflags+ value
+ is automatically setup for SMP hosts to match the number of cores the
+ host has.
+
+%install
+^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%install+ macro starts a block that continues until the next block
+macro. The install block is a series of shell commands that execute to install
+the package. You can assume the package has build correctly when this block
+starts executing.
+
+Never install the package to the actual *prefix* the package was built
+with. Always install to the RTEMS Source Builder's temporary path defined in
+the macro variable +\__tmpdir+. The RTEMS Source Builder sets up a shell
+environment variable called +SB_BUILD_ROOT+ as the standard install point. Most
+packages support adding +DESTDIR=+ to the *make install* command.
+
+Looking at the same example as in <<_build, %build>>:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %install
+ export PATH="%{_bindir}:${PATH}" <1>
+ rm -rf $SB_BUILD_ROOT <2>
+
+ cd texane-stlink-%{stlink_version} <3>
+ %{__make} DESTDIR=$SB_BUILD_ROOT install <4>
+
+ cd ..
+
+- *<1>* Setup the PATH environment variable. This is not always needed.
+
+- *<2>* Clean any installed files. This make sure the install is just
+ what the package installs and not any left over files from a broken
+ build or install.
+
+- *<3>* Enter the build directory. In this example it just happens to
+ be the source directory.
+
+- *<4>* Run +make install+ to install the package overriding the +DESTDIR+
+ make variable.
+
+%clean
+^^^^^^
+
+The +%clean+ macro starts a block that continues until the next block
+macro. The clean block is a series of shell commands that execute to clean up
+after a package has been built and install. This macro is currenly not been
+used because the RTEMS Source Builder automatically cleans up.
+
+%include
+^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%include+ macro inline includes the specific file. The +\__confdir+
+path is searched. Any relative path component of the include file is appended
+to each part of the +\__configdir+. Adding an extension is optional as files
+with +.bset+ and +.cfg+ are automatically searched for.
+
+Inline including means the file is processed as part of the configuration at
+the point it is included. Parsing continues from the next line in the
+configuration file that contains the +%include+ macro.
+
+Including files allow a kind of configuration file reuse. The outer
+configuration files provide specific information such as package version
+numbers and patches and then include a generic configuration script which
+builds the package.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %include %{_configdir}/gcc-4.7-1.cfg
+
+%name
+^^^^^
+
+The name of the package being built. The name typically contains the components
+of the package and their version number plus a revision number. For the GCC
+with Newlib configuration the name is typically:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ Name: %{_target}-gcc-%{gcc_version}-newlib-%{newlib_version}-%{release}
+
+%summary
+^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%summary+ is a brief description of the package. It is useful when
+reporting. This information is not capture in the package anywhere. For the GCC
+with Newlib configuration the summary is typically:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ Summary: GCC v%{gcc_version} and Newlib v%{newlib_version} for target %{_target} on host %{_host}
+
+%release
+^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%release+ is packaging number that allows revisions of a package to happen
+where none package versions change. This value typically increases when the
+configuration building the package changes.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %define release 1
+
+%version
+^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%version% macro sets the version the package. If the package is a single
+component it tracks that component's version number. For example in the
+*libusb* configuration the +%version+ is the same as +%libusb_version+, however
+in a GCC with Newlib configuration there is no single version number. In this
+case the GCC version is used.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ Version: %{gcc_version}
+
+%buildarch
+^^^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%buildarch+ macro is set to the architecture the package contains. This is
+currently not used in the RTEMS Source Builder and may go away. This macro is
+more important in a real packaging system where the package could end up on the
+wrong architecture.
+
+%source
+^^^^^^^
+
+The +%source+ macro has 3 commands that controls what it does. You can +set+
+the source files, +add+ source files to a source group, and +setup+ the source
+file group getting it ready to be used.
+
+Source files are source code files in tar or zip files that are unpacked,
+copied or symbolically linked into the package's build tree. Building a package
+requires one or more dependent packages. These are typically the packages
+source code plus dependent libraries or modules. You can create any number of
+these source groups and set each of them up with a separe source group for each
+needed library or module. Each source group normally has a single tar, zip or
+repository and the +set+ defines this. Some projects split the source code into
+separate tar or zip files and you install them by using the +add+ command.
+
+The first instance of a +set+ command creates the source group and sets the
+source files to be set up. Subsequence +set+ commands for the same source group
+are ignored. this lets you define the standard source files and override them
+for specific releases or snapshots.. To set a source file group:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source set gcc <1> ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gcc/gcc-%{gcc_version}/gcc-%{gcc_version}.tar.bz2
+
+- *<1>* The source group is +gcc+.
+
+To add another source package to be installed into the same source tree you use
+the +add+ command:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source add gcc ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gcc/gcc-%{gcc_version}/g++-%{gcc_version}.tar.bz2
+
+The source +setup+ command can only be issued in the +%prep:+ section. The
+setup is:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %source gcc setup -q -T -D -n %{name}-%{version}
+
+Accepted options are:
+
+[horizontal]
+*Switch*:: *Description*
++-n+:: The -n option is used to set the name of the software's build
+directory. This is necessary only when the source archive unpacks into a
+directory named other than +<name>-<version>+.
++-c+:: The -c option is used to direct %setup to create the top-level build
+directory before unpacking the sources.
++-D+:: The -D option is used to direct %setup to not delete the build directory
+prior to unpacking the sources. This option is used when more than one source
+archive is to be unpacked into the build directory, normally with the +-b+ or
++-a+ options.
++-T+:: The -T option is used to direct %setup to not perform the default
+unpacking of the source archive specified by the first Source: macro. It is used
+with the +-a+ or +-b+ options.
++-b <n>+:: The -b option is used to direct %setup to unpack the source archive
+specified on the nth Source: macro line before changing directory into the build
+directory.
+
+%patch
+^^^^^^
+
+The +%patch+ macro has the same 3 command as the +%source+ command however the
++set+ commands is not really that useful with the with command. You add patches
+with the +add+ command and +setup+ applies the patches. Patch options can be
+added to each patch by placing them before the patch URL. If no patch option is
+provided the default options passed to the +setup+ command are used. An option
+starts with a '-'. The +setup+ command must reside inside the +%prep+ section.
+
+Patches are grouped in a similar way to the +%source+ macro so you can control
+applying a group of patches to a specific source tree.
+
+The +__patchdir+ path is search.
+
+To add a patch:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %patch add gcc <1> gcc-4.7.2-rtems4.11-20121026.diff
+ %patch add gcc -p0 <2> gcc-4.7.2-rtems4.11-20121101.diff
+
+- *<1>* The patch group is +gcc+.
+
+- *<2>* Option for this specific patch.
+
+Placing +%patch setup+ in the +%prep+ section will apply the groups patches.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %patch setup gcc <1> -p1 <2>
+
+- *<1>* The patch group.
+
+- *<2>* The default option used to apply the patch.
+
+%hash
+^^^^^
+
+The +%hash+ macro requires 3 arguments and defines a checksum for a specific
+file. The checksum is not applied until the file is checked before downloading
+and once downloaded. A patch or source file that does not has a hash defined
+generates a warning.
+
+A file to be checksum must be unqiue in the any of the source and patch
+directories. The basename of the file is used as the key for the hash.
+
+The hash algorthim can be 'md5', 'sha1', 'sha224', 'sha256', 'sha384', and
+'sha512' and we typically use 'md5'.
+
+To add a hash:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %hash md5 <1> net-snmp-%{net_snmp_version}.tar.gz <2> 7db683faba037249837b226f64d566d4 <3>
+
+- *<1>* The type of checksum.
+
+- *<2>* The file to checksum. It can contain macros that are expanded for you.
+
+- *<3>* The MD5 hash for the Net-SNMP file +net-snmp-5.7.2.1.tar.gz+.
+
+Do not include a path with the file name. Only the basename is required. Files
+can be searched for from a number of places and having a path conponent would
+create confusion. This does mean files with hashes must be unique.
+
+Downloading of repositories such as git and cvs cannot be checksumed. It is
+assumed those protocols and tools manage the state of the files.
+
+%echo
+^^^^^
+
+The +%echo+ macro outputs the following string to stdout. This can also be used
+as ``%{echo: message}``.
+
+%warning
+^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%warning+ macro outputs the following string as a warning. This can also
+be used as ``%{warning: message}``.
+
+%error
+^^^^^^
+
+The +%error+ macro outputs the follow string as an error and exits the RTEMS
+Source Builder. This can also be used as ``%{error: message}``.
+
+%select
+^^^^^^^
+
+The +%select+ macro selects the map specified. If there is no map no error or
+warning is generated. Macro maps provide a simple way for a user to override
+the settings is a configuration file without having to edit it. The changes are
+recorded in the build report so can be traced.
+
+Configuration use different maps so macro overrides can target a specific
+package.
+
+The default map is ``global``.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %select gcc-4.8-snapshot <1>
+ %define one_plus_one 2 <2>
+
+- *<1>* The map switches to ``gcc-4.8-snapshot``. Any overrides in this
+ map will be used.
+
+- *<2>* Defining macros only updates the ``global`` map and not the
+ selected map.
+
+%define
+^^^^^^^
+
+The +%define+ macro defines a new macro or updates an existing one. If no value
+is given it is assumed to be 1.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %define foo bar
+ %define one_plus_one 2
+ %define one <1>
+
+- *<1>* The macro _one_ is set to 1.
+
+%undefine
+^^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%undefine+ macro removes a macro if it exists. Any further references to
+it will result in an undefine macro error.
+
+%if
+^^^
+
+The +%if+ macro starts a conditional logic block that can optionally have a
+*else* section. A test follows this macro and can have the following operators:
+
+.. list-table:: Operators
+ : header-rows: 1
+
+ * - %{}
+ - Check the macro is set or *true*, ie non-zero.
+ %if ${foo}
+ %warning The test passes, must not be empty or is non-zero
+ %else
+ %error The test fails, must be empty or zero
+ %endif
+ * - \!
+ - The *not* operator inverts the test of the macro.
+ %if ! ${foo}
+ %warning The test passes, must be empty or zero
+ %else
+ %error The test fails, must not be empty or is non-zero
+ %endif
+ * - ==
+ - The left hand size must equal the right hand side. For example:
+ %define one 1
+ %if ${one} == 1
+ %warning The test passes
+ %else
+ %error The test fails
+ %endif
+ You can also check to see if a macro is empty:
+ %if ${nothing} == %{nil}
+ %warning The test passes
+ %else
+ %error The test fails
+ * - !=
+ - The left hand size does not equal the right hand side. For example:
+ %define one 1
+ %if ${one} != 2
+ %warning The test passes
+ %else
+ %error The test fails
+ %endif
+ You can also check to see if something is set:
+ %if ${something} != %{nil}
+ %warning The test passes
+ %else
+ %error The test fails
+ %endif
+ * - >
+ - The left hand side is numerically greater than the right hand side.
+ * - >
+ - The left hand side is numerically greater than or equal to the
+ right hand side.
+ * - <
+ - The left hand side is numerically less than the right hand side.
+ * - <=
+ - The left hand side is numerically less than or equal to the
+ right hand side.
+
+%ifn
+^^^^
+
+The +%ifn+ macro inverts the normal +%if+ logic. It avoids needing to provide
+empty *if* blocks followed by *else* blocks. It is useful when checking if a
+macro is defined:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ %ifn %{defined foo}
+ %define foo bar
+ %endif
+
+%ifarch
+^^^^^^^
+
+The +%ifarch+ is a short cut for "+%if %{\_arch} == i386+". Currently not used.
+
+%ifnarch
+^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%ifnarch+ is a short cut for "+%if %{\_arch} != i386+". Currently not
+used.
+
+%ifos
+^^^^^
+
+The +%ifos+ is a short cut for "+%if %{\_os} != mingw32+". It allows
+conditional support for various operating system differences when building
+packages.
+
+%else
+^^^^^
+
+The +%else+ macro starts the conditional *else* block.
+
+%endfi
+^^^^^^
+
+The +%endif+ macro ends a conditional logic block.
+
+%bconf_with
+^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%bconf_with+ macro provides a way to test if the user has passed a
+specific option on the command line with the +--with-<label>+ option. This
+option is only available with the +sb-builder+ command.
+
+%bconf_without
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+The +%bconf_without+ macro provides a way to test if the user has passed a
+specific option on the command line with the +--without-<label>+ option. This
+option is only available with the +sb-builder+ command.
+
+Commands
+########
+
+Checker (sb-check)
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+This commands checks your system is set up correctly. Most options are ignored.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-check --help
+ sb-check: [options] [args]
+ RTEMS Source Builder, an RTEMS Tools Project (c) 2012-2013 Chris Johns
+ Options and arguments:
+ --force : Force the build to proceed
+ --quiet : Quiet output (not used)
+ --trace : Trace the execution
+ --dry-run : Do everything but actually run the build
+ --warn-all : Generate warnings
+ --no-clean : Do not clean up the build tree
+ --always-clean : Always clean the build tree, even with an error
+ --jobs : Run with specified number of jobs, default: num CPUs.
+ --host : Set the host triplet
+ --build : Set the build triplet
+ --target : Set the target triplet
+ --prefix path : Tools build prefix, ie where they are installed
+ --topdir path : Top of the build tree, default is $PWD
+ --configdir path : Path to the configuration directory, default: ./config
+ --builddir path : Path to the build directory, default: ./build
+ --sourcedir path : Path to the source directory, default: ./source
+ --tmppath path : Path to the temp directory, default: ./tmp
+ --macros file[,[file] : Macro format files to load after the defaults
+ --log file : Log file where all build out is written too
+ --url url[,url] : URL to look for source
+ --no-download : Disable the source downloader
+ --targetcflags flags : List of C flags for the target code
+ --targetcxxflags flags : List of C++ flags for the target code
+ --libstdcxxflags flags : List of C++ flags to build the target libstdc++ code
+ --with-<label> : Add the --with-<label> to the build
+ --without-<label> : Add the --without-<label> to the build
+ --regression : Set --no-install, --keep-going and --always-clean
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-check
+ RTEMS Source Builder - Check, v0.2.0
+ Environment is ok
+
+Defaults (sb-defaults)
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+This commands outputs and the default macros for your when given no
+arguments. Most options are ignored.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-defaults --help
+ sb-defaults: [options] [args]
+ RTEMS Source Builder, an RTEMS Tools Project (c) 2012-2013 Chris Johns
+ Options and arguments:
+ --force : Force the build to proceed
+ --quiet : Quiet output (not used)
+ --trace : Trace the execution
+ --dry-run : Do everything but actually run the build
+ --warn-all : Generate warnings
+ --no-clean : Do not clean up the build tree
+ --always-clean : Always clean the build tree, even with an error
+ --jobs : Run with specified number of jobs, default: num CPUs.
+ --host : Set the host triplet
+ --build : Set the build triplet
+ --target : Set the target triplet
+ --prefix path : Tools build prefix, ie where they are installed
+ --topdir path : Top of the build tree, default is $PWD
+ --configdir path : Path to the configuration directory, default: ./config
+ --builddir path : Path to the build directory, default: ./build
+ --sourcedir path : Path to the source directory, default: ./source
+ --tmppath path : Path to the temp directory, default: ./tmp
+ --macros file[,[file] : Macro format files to load after the defaults
+ --log file : Log file where all build out is written too
+ --url url[,url] : URL to look for source
+ --no-download : Disable the source downloader
+ --targetcflags flags : List of C flags for the target code
+ --targetcxxflags flags : List of C++ flags for the target code
+ --libstdcxxflags flags : List of C++ flags to build the target libstdc++ code
+ --with-<label> : Add the --with-<label> to the build
+ --without-<label> : Add the --without-<label> to the build
+ --regression : Set --no-install, --keep-going and --always-clean
+
+Set Builder (sb-set-builder)
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+This command builds a set.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --help
+ RTEMS Source Builder, an RTEMS Tools Project (c) 2012-2013 Chris Johns
+ Options and arguments:
+ --force : Force the build to proceed
+ --quiet : Quiet output (not used)
+ --trace : Trace the execution
+ --dry-run : Do everything but actually run the build
+ --warn-all : Generate warnings
+ --no-clean : Do not clean up the build tree
+ --always-clean : Always clean the build tree, even with an error
+ --regression : Set --no-install, --keep-going and --always-clean
+ ---jobs : Run with specified number of jobs, default: num CPUs.
+ --host : Set the host triplet
+ --build : Set the build triplet
+ --target : Set the target triplet
+ --prefix path : Tools build prefix, ie where they are installed
+ --topdir path : Top of the build tree, default is $PWD
+ --configdir path : Path to the configuration directory, default: ./config
+ --builddir path : Path to the build directory, default: ./build
+ --sourcedir path : Path to the source directory, default: ./source
+ --tmppath path : Path to the temp directory, default: ./tmp
+ --macros file[,[file] : Macro format files to load after the defaults
+ --log file : Log file where all build out is written too
+ --url url[,url] : URL to look for source
+ --no-download : Disable the source downloader
+ --no-install : Do not install the packages to the prefix
+ --targetcflags flags : List of C flags for the target code
+ --targetcxxflags flags : List of C++ flags for the target code
+ --libstdcxxflags flags : List of C++ flags to build the target libstdc++ code
+ --with-<label> : Add the --with-<label> to the build
+ --without-<label> : Add the --without-<label> to the build
+ --mail-from : Email address the report is from.
+ --mail-to : Email address to send the email too.
+ --mail : Send email report or results.
+ --smtp-host : SMTP host to send via.
+ --no-report : Do not create a package report.
+ --report-format : The report format (text, html, asciidoc).
+ --bset-tar-file : Create a build set tar file
+ --pkg-tar-files : Create package tar files
+ --list-bsets : List available build sets
+ --list-configs : List available configurations
+ --list-deps : List the dependent files.
+
+.Arguments
+The +[args]+ are a list build sets to build.
+
+.Options
++--force+;;
+Force the build to proceed even if the host check fails. Typically this happens
+if executable files are found in the path at a different location to the host
+defaults.
++--trace+;;
+Trace enable printing of debug information to stdout. It is really only of use
+to RTEMS Source Builder's developers.
++--dry-run+;;
+Do everything but actually run the build commands. This is useful when checking
+a new configuration parses cleanly.
++--warn-all+;;
+Generate warnings.
++--no-clean+;;
+Do not clean up the build tree during the cleaning phase of the build. This
+leaves the source and the build output on disk so you can make changes, or
+amend or generate new patches. It also allows you to review configure type
+output such as +config.log+.
++--always-clean+;;
+Clean away the results of a build even if the build fails. This is normally
+used with ``--keep-going`` when regression testing to see which build sets
+fail to build. It keeps the disk usage down.
++--jobs+;;
+Control the number of jobs make is given. The jobs can be 'none' for only 1
+job, 'half' so the number of jobs is half the number of detected cores, a
+fraction such as '0.25' so the number of jobs is a quarter of the number of
+detected cores and a number such as '25' which forces the number of jobs to
+that number.
++--host+;;
+Set the host triplet value. Be careful with this option.
++--build+;;
+Set the build triplet. Be careful with this option.
++--target+;;
+Set the target triplet. Be careful with this option. This is useful if you have
+a generic configuration script that can work for a range of architectures.
++--prefix path+;;
+Tools build prefix, ie where they are installed.
++--topdir path+;;
+Top of the build tree, that is the current directory you are in.
++--configdir path+;;
+Path to the configuration directory. This overrides the built in defaults.
++--builddir path+;;
+Path to the build directory. This overrides the default of +build+.
++--sourcedir path+;;
+Path to the source directory. This overrides the default of +source+.
++--tmppath path+;;
+Path to the temporary directory. This overrides the default of +tmp+.
++--macros files+;;
+Macro files to load. The configuration directory path is searched.
++--log file+;;
+Log all the output from the build process. The output is directed to +stdout+
+if no log file is provided.
++--url url+;;
+URL to look for source when downloading. This is can be comma separate list.
++--no-download+;;
+Disable downloading of source and patches. If the source is not found an error
+is raised.
++--targetcflags flags+;;
+List of C flags for the target code. This allows for specific local
+customisation when testing new variations.
++--targetcxxflags flags+;;
+List of C++ flags for the target code. This allows for specific local
+customisation when testing new variations.
++--libstdcxxflags flags+;;
+List of C\++ flags to build the target libstdc++ code. This allows for specific
+local customisation when testing new variations.
++--with-<label>+;;
+Add the --with-<label> to the build. This can be tested for in a script with
+the +%bconf_with+ macro.
++--without-<label>+;;
+Add the --without-<label> to the build. This can be tested for in a script with
+the +%bconf_without+ macro.
++--mail-from+;;
+Set the from mail address if report mailing is enabled.
++--mail-to+;;
+Set the to mail address if report mailing is enabled. The report is mailed to
+this address.
++--mail+;;
+Mail the build report to the mail to address.
++--smtp-host+;;
+The SMTP host to use to send the email. The default is +localhost+.
++--no-report+;;
+Do not create a report format.
++--report-format format+;;
+The report format can be 'text' or 'html'. The default is 'html'.
++--keep-going+;;
+Do not stop on error. This is useful if your build sets performs a large number
+of testing related builds and there are errors.
++--always-clean+.
+Always clean the build tree even with a failure.
++--no-install+;;
+Do not install the packages to the prefix. Use this if you are only after the
+tar files.
++--regression+;;
+A convenience option which is the same as +--no-install+, +--keep-going+ and
++--bset-tar-file+;;
+Create a build set tar file. This is a single tar file of all the packages in
+the build set.
++--pkg-tar-files+;;
+Create package tar files. A tar file will be created for each package built in
+a build set.
++--list-bsets+;;
+List available build sets.
++--list-configs+;;
+List available configurations.
++--list-deps+;;
+Print a list of dependent files used by a build set. Dependent files have a
+'dep[?]' prefix where '?' is a number. The files are listed alphabetically.
+
+Set Builder (sb-builder)
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+This command builds a configuration as described in a configuration
+file. Configuration files have the extension of +.cfg+.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ ./source-builder/sb-builder --help
+ sb-builder: [options] [args]
+ RTEMS Source Builder, an RTEMS Tools Project (c) 2012 Chris Johns
+ Options and arguments:
+ --force : Force the build to proceed
+ --quiet : Quiet output (not used)
+ --trace : Trace the execution
+ --dry-run : Do everything but actually run the build
+ --warn-all : Generate warnings
+ --no-clean : Do not clean up the build tree
+ --always-clean : Always clean the build tree, even with an error
+ --jobs : Run with specified number of jobs, default: num CPUs.
+ --host : Set the host triplet
+ --build : Set the build triplet
+ --target : Set the target triplet
+ --prefix path : Tools build prefix, ie where they are installed
+ --topdir path : Top of the build tree, default is $PWD
+ --configdir path : Path to the configuration directory, default: ./config
+ --builddir path : Path to the build directory, default: ./build
+ --sourcedir path : Path to the source directory, default: ./source
+ --tmppath path : Path to the temp directory, default: ./tmp
+ --macros file[,[file] : Macro format files to load after the defaults
+ --log file : Log file where all build out is written too
+ --url url[,url] : URL to look for source
+ --targetcflags flags : List of C flags for the target code
+ --targetcxxflags flags : List of C++ flags for the target code
+ --libstdcxxflags flags : List of C++ flags to build the target libstdc++ code
+ --with-<label> : Add the --with-<label> to the build
+ --without-<label> : Add the --without-<label> to the build
+ --list-configs : List available configurations
+
+Host Setups
+###########
+
+The host versions are listed. If a later version of the host operating system
+exists it should work unless listed.
+
+Please provide patches to update these sections if they are wrong or need
+updating. I cannot install and test each one and rely on getting your feedback.
+
+Linux
+~~~~~
+
+A number of different Linux distrubutions are known to work. The following have
+been tested and report as working.
+
+.. _ArchLinux:
+
+ArchLinux
+^^^^^^^^^
+
+The following packages are required on a fresh Archlinux 64bit installation:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # pacman -S base-devel gdb xz unzip ncurses git zlib
+
+Archlinux, by default installs ``texinfo-5`` which is incompatible for building
+GCC 4.7 tree. You will have to obtain ``texinfo-legacy`` from ``AUR`` and provide
+a manual override.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # pacman -R texinfo
+ $ yaourt -S texinfo-legacy
+ # ln -s /usr/bin/makeinfo-4.13a /usr/bin/makeinfo
+
+.. _CentOS:
+
+CentOS
+^^^^^^
+
+The following packages are required on a minimal CentOS 6.3 64bit installation:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # yum install autoconf automake binutils gcc gcc-c++ gdb make patch \
+ bison flex xz unzip ncurses-devel texinfo zlib-devel python-devel git
+
+The minimal CentOS distribution is a specific DVD that installs a minimal
+system. If you use a full system some of these packages may have been
+installed.
+
+.. _Fedora:
+
+Fedora
+^^^^^^
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder has been tested on Fedora 19 64bit with the following packages.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # yum install ncurses-devel python-devel git bison gcc cvs gcc-c++ \
+ flex texinfo patch perl-Text-ParseWords zlib-devel
+
+.. _Raspbian:
+
+Raspbian
+^^^^^^^^
+
+The is the Debian distribution for the Raspberry Pi. The following packages are
+required.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ sudo apt-get install autoconf automake bison flex binutils gcc g++ gdb \
+ texinfo unzip ncurses-dev python-dev git
+
+It is recommended you get Model B of the Pi with 512M of memory and to mount a
+remote disk over the network. The tools can be build with a prefix under your
+home directory as recommended and end up on the SD card.
+
+.. _Ubuntu:
+.. _Xubuntu:
+
+Ubuntu
+^^^^^^
+
+The latest testing was with Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS 64bit. This section also
+includes Xubuntu. A minimal installation was used and the following
+packages installed.
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ sudo apt-get build-dep binutils gcc g++ gdb unzip git
+ $ sudo apt-get install python2.7-dev
+
+.. _Linux Mint:
+
+Linux Mint
+^^^^^^^^^^
+
+zlib package is required on Linux Mint. It has a different name (other
+than the usual zlib-dev):
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # sudo apt-get install zlib1g-dev
+
+.. _openSUSE:
+
+openSUSE
+^^^^^^^^
+
+This has been reported to work but no instructions were provided. This is
+an opportunity to contribute. Please submit any guidance you can provide.
+
+.. _FreeBSD:
+
+FreeBSD
+~~~~~~~
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder has been tested on FreeBSD 9.1 and 10.0 64bit. You
+need to install some ports. They are:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # cd /usr/ports
+ # portinstall --batch lang/python27
+
+If you wish to build Windows (mingw32) tools please install the following
+ports:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # cd /usr/ports
+ # portinstall --batch devel/mingw32-binutils devel/mingw32-gcc
+ # portinstall --batch devel/mingw32-zlib devel/mingw32-pthreads
+
+The +zlip+ and +pthreads+ ports for MinGW32 are used for builiding a Windows
+QEMU.
+
+If you are on FreeBSD 10.0 and you have pkgng installed you can use 'pkg
+install' rather than 'portinstall'.
+
+.. _NetBSD:
+
+NetBSD
+~~~~~~
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder has been tested on NetBSD 6.1 i386. Packages to add
+are:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ # pkg_add ftp://ftp.netbsd.org/pub/pkgsrc/packages/NetBSD/i386/6.1/devel/gmake-3.82nb7.tgz
+ # pkg_add ftp://ftp.netbsd.org/pub/pkgsrc/packages/NetBSD/i386/6.1/devel/bison-2.7.1.tgz
+ # pkg_add ftp://ftp.netbsd.org/pub/pkgsrc/packages/NetBSD/i386/6.1/archivers/xz-5.0.4.tgz
+
+.. _MacOS:
+
+MacOS
+~~~~~
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder has been tested on Mountain Lion. You will need to
+install the Xcode app using the *App Store* tool, run Xcode and install the
+Developers Tools package within Xcode.
+
+.. _Mavericks:
+
+Mavericks
+^^^^^^^^^
+
+The RSB works on Mavericks and the GNU tools can be built for RTEMS using the
+Mavericks clang LLVM tool chain. You will need to build and install a couple of
+packages to make the RSB pass the +sb-check+. These are CVS and XZ. You can get
+these tools from a packaging tool for MacOS such as *MacPorts* or *HomeBrew*.
+
+I do not use 3rd party packaging on MacOS and prefer to build the packages from
+source using a prefix of '/usr/local'. There are good 3rd party packages around
+however they sometimes bring in extra dependence and that complicates my build
+environment and I want to know the minimal requirements when building
+tools. The following are required:
+
+. The XZ package's home page is http://tukaani.org/xz/ and I use version
+ 5.0.5. XZ builds and installs cleanly.
+
+. CVS can be found at http://cvs.nongnu.org/ and I use version 1.11.23. CVS
+ requires the following patch
+ http://ftp.rtems.org/pub/rtems/people/chrisj/source-builder/cvs-1.11.23-osx-maverick.diff
+ to build. Place the diff in the same directory as the unpacked cvs-1.11.23
+ and apply with +patch -p0 < cvs-1.11.23-osx-maverick.diff+.
+
+.. _Windows:
+
+Windows
+~~~~~~~
+
+Windows tool sets are supported. The tools are native Windows executable which
+means they do not need an emulation layer to run once built. The tools
+understand and use standard Windows paths and integrate easily into Windows IDE
+environments because they understand and use standard Windows paths. Native
+Windows tools have proven over time to be stable and reliable with good
+performance. If you are a Windows user or you are required to use Windows you
+can still develop RTEMS application as easily as a Unix operating system. Some
+debugging experiences may vary and if this is an issue please raised the topic
+on the RTEMS Users mailing list.
+
+Building the tools or some other packages may require a Unix or POSIX type
+shell. There are a few options, Cygwin and MSYS2. I recommend MSYS2.
+
+.Ready To Go Windows Tools
+NOTE: From time to time I provide tools for Windows at
+http://ftp.rtems.org/pub/rtems/people/chrisj/source-builder/4.11/mingw32/
+
+.. _MSYS2:
+
+MSYS2
+
+This is a new version of the old MinGW project's original MSYS based around the
+Arch Linux pacman packager. MSYS and MSYS2 are a specific fork of the Cygwin
+project with some fundamental changes in the handling of paths and mounts that
+allow easy interaction between the emulated POSIX environment and the native
+Windows environment.
+
+Install MSYS2 using the installer you can download from
+https://msys2.github.io/. Follow the instructions on the install page and make
+sure you remove any global path entries to any other Cygwin, MinGW, MSYS or
+packages that may uses a Cygwin DLL, for example some ports of Git.
+
+To build the tools you need install the following packages using pacman:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ $ pacman -S git cvs bison make texinfo patch unzip diffutils tar \
+ mingw64/mingw-w64-x86_64-gcc mingw64/mingw-w64-x86_64-binutils
+
+To build make sure you add '--without-python --jobs=none' to the standard RSB
+command line. MSYS2 has a temp file name issue and so the GNU AR steps on
+itself when running in parallel on SMP hardware which means we have to set the
+jobs option to none.
+
+Install a suitable version of Python from http://www.python.org/ and add it to
+the start of your path. The MSYS2 python does not work with waf.
+
+.. _Cygwin:
+
+Cygwin
+
+Building on Windows is a little more complicated because the Cygwin shell is
+used rather than the MSYS2 shell. The MSYS2 shell is simpler because the
+detected host triple is MinGW so the build is standard cross-compiler build.
+A Canadian cross-build using Cygwin is supported if you would like native tools.
+
+Install a recent Cygwin version using the Cygwin setup tool. Select and install
+the groups and packages listed:
+
+.Cygwin Packages
+[options="header,compact",width="50%",cols="20%,80%"]
+|================================
+|Group |Package
+|Archive |bsdtar
+| |unzip
+| |xz
+|Devel |autoconf
+| |autoconf2.1
+| |autoconf2.5
+| |automake
+| |binutils
+| |bison
+| |flex
+| |gcc4-core
+| |gcc4-g++
+| |git
+| |make
+| |mingw64-x86_64-binutils
+| |mingw64-x86_64-gcc-core
+| |mingw64-x86_64-g++
+| |mingw64-x86_64-runtime
+| |mingw64-x86_64-zlib
+| |patch
+| |zlib-devel
+|MinGW |mingw-zlib-devel
+|Python |python
+|================================
+
+The setup tool will add a number of dependent package and it is ok to accept
+them.
+
+I have found turning off Windows Defender improves performance if you have
+another up to date virus detection tool installed and enabled. I used the
+excellent ``Process Hacker 2`` tool to monitor the performance and I found the
+Windows Defender service contributed a high load. In my case I had a 3rd party
+virus tool installed so the Windows Defender service was not needed.
+
+A Canadian cross-compile (Cxc) is required on Cygwin because the host is Cygwin
+therefore a traditional cross-compile will result in Cygiwn binaries. With a
+Canadian cross-compile a Cygwin cross-compiler is built as well as the MinGW
+RTEMS cross-compiler. The Cygwin cross-compiler is required to build the C
+runtime for the RTEMS target because we are building under Cygiwn. The build
+output for an RTEMS 4.10 ARM tool set is:
+
+.. code-block: shell
+
+ chris@cygthing ~/development/rtems/src/rtems-source-builder/rtems
+ $ ../source-builder/sb-set-builder --log=l-arm.txt --prefix=$HOME/development/rtems/4.10 4.10/rtems-arm
+ RTEMS Source Builder - Set Builder, v0.2
+ Build Set: 4.10/rtems-arm
+ config: expat-2.1.0-1.cfg
+ package: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-w64-mingw32-1
+ building: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-w64-mingw32-1
+ reporting: expat-2.1.0-1.cfg -> expat-2.1.0-x86_64-w64-mingw32-1.html
+ config: tools/rtems-binutils-2.20.1-1.cfg
+ package: arm-rtems4.10-binutils-2.20.1-1 <1>
+ building: arm-rtems4.10-binutils-2.20.1-1
+ package: (Cxc) arm-rtems4.10-binutils-2.20.1-1 <2>
+ building: (Cxc) arm-rtems4.10-binutils-2.20.1-1
+ reporting: tools/rtems-binutils-2.20.1-1.cfg ->
+ arm-rtems4.10-binutils-2.20.1-1.html
+ config: tools/rtems-gcc-4.4.7-newlib-1.18.0-1.cfg
+ package: arm-rtems4.10-gcc-4.4.7-newlib-1.18.0-1
+ building: arm-rtems4.10-gcc-4.4.7-newlib-1.18.0-1
+ package: (Cxc) arm-rtems4.10-gcc-4.4.7-newlib-1.18.0-1
+ building: (Cxc) arm-rtems4.10-gcc-4.4.7-newlib-1.18.0-1
+ reporting: tools/rtems-gcc-4.4.7-newlib-1.18.0-1.cfg ->
+ arm-rtems4.10-gcc-4.4.7-newlib-1.18.0-1.html
+ config: tools/rtems-gdb-7.3.1-1.cfg
+ package: arm-rtems4.10-gdb-7.3.1-1
+ building: arm-rtems4.10-gdb-7.3.1-1
+ reporting: tools/rtems-gdb-7.3.1-1.cfg -> arm-rtems4.10-gdb-7.3.1-1.html
+ config: tools/rtems-kernel-4.10.2.cfg
+ package: arm-rtems4.10-kernel-4.10.2-1
+ building: arm-rtems4.10-kernel-4.10.2-1
+ reporting: tools/rtems-kernel-4.10.2.cfg -> arm-rtems4.10-kernel-4.10.2-1.html
+ installing: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-w64-mingw32-1 -> /cygdrive/c/Users/chris/development/rtems/4.10
+ installing: arm-rtems4.10-binutils-2.20.1-1 -> /cygdrive/c/Users/chris/development/rtems/4.10 <3>
+ installing: arm-rtems4.10-gcc-4.4.7-newlib-1.18.0-1 -> /cygdrive/c/Users/chris/development/rtems/4.10
+ installing: arm-rtems4.10-gdb-7.3.1-1 -> /cygdrive/c/Users/chris/development/rtems/4.10
+ installing: arm-rtems4.10-kernel-4.10.2-1 -> /cygdrive/c/Users/chris/development/rtems/4.10
+ cleaning: expat-2.1.0-x86_64-w64-mingw32-1
+ cleaning: arm-rtems4.10-binutils-2.20.1-1
+ cleaning: arm-rtems4.10-gcc-4.4.7-newlib-1.18.0-1
+ cleaning: arm-rtems4.10-gdb-7.3.1-1
+ cleaning: arm-rtems4.10-kernel-4.10.2-1
+ Build Set: Time 10:09:42.810547 <4>
+
+- *<1>* The Cygwin version of the ARM cross-binutils.
+- *<2>* The +(Cxc)+ indicates this is the MinGW build of the package.
+- *<3>* Only the MinGW version is installed.
+- *<4>* Cygwin is slow so please be patient. This time was on an AMD
+ Athlon 64bit Dual Core 6000+ running at 3GHz with 4G RAM running Windows
+ 7 64bit.
+
+CAUTION: Cygwin documents the 'Big List Of Dodgy Apps' or 'BLODA'. The link is
+http://cygwin.com/faq/faq.html#faq.using.bloda and it is worth a
+look. You will see a large number of common pieces of software found on Windows
+systems that can cause problems. My testing has been performed with NOD32
+running and I have seen some failures. The list is for all of Cygwin so I am
+not sure which of the listed programs effect the RTEMS Source Biulder. The
+following FAQ item talks about +fork+ failures and presents some technical
+reasons they cannot be avoided in all cases. Cygwin and it's fork MSYS are
+fantastic pieces of software in a difficult environment. I have found building
+a single tool tends to work, building all at once is harder.
+
+
+History
+#######
+
+The RTEMS Source Builder is a stand alone tool based on another tool called the
+'SpecBuilder'. The SpecBuilder was written for the RTEMS project to give me a
+way to build tools on hosts that did not support RPMs. At the time the RTEMS
+tools maintainer only used spec files to create various packages. This meant I
+had either spec files, RPM files or SRPM files. The RPM and SPRM files where
+useless because you needed an 'rpm' type tool to extract and manage them. There
+are versions of 'rpm' for a number of non-RPM hosts however these proved to be
+in various broken states and randomly maintained. The solution I settled on was
+to use spec files so I wrote a Python based tool that parsed the spec file
+format and allowed me to create a shell script I could run to build the
+package. This approach proved successful and I was able to track the RPM
+version of the RTEMS tools on a non-RPM host over a number of years. however
+the SpecBuilder tool did not help me build tools or other packages not related
+to the RTEMS project where there was no spec file I could use so I needed
+another tool. Rather than start again I decided to take the parsing code for
+the spec file format and build a new tool called the RTEMS Source Builder.