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authorChris Johns <chrisj@rtems.org>2016-04-11 13:53:58 +1000
committerAmar Takhar <verm@darkbeer.org>2016-05-02 20:51:27 -0400
commitb41203897a7bfc7ab4a446808494e6216eff7c56 (patch)
tree86d36928e7650e679d5bc65d6fdd0d4adc45ac67 /networking/using_networking_rtems_app.rst
parentea0777e4ee35c7a67274771200233efabd2797b0 (diff)
downloadrtems-docs-b41203897a7bfc7ab4a446808494e6216eff7c56.tar.bz2
Clean up and review of Networking User Guide.
Diffstat (limited to 'networking/using_networking_rtems_app.rst')
-rw-r--r--networking/using_networking_rtems_app.rst1254
1 files changed, 625 insertions, 629 deletions
diff --git a/networking/using_networking_rtems_app.rst b/networking/using_networking_rtems_app.rst
index bd6f9f5..dfc422b 100644
--- a/networking/using_networking_rtems_app.rst
+++ b/networking/using_networking_rtems_app.rst
@@ -1,3 +1,8 @@
+.. COMMENT: Written by Eric Norum
+.. COMMENT: COPYRIGHT (c) 1988-2002.
+.. COMMENT: On-Line Applications Research Corporation (OAR).
+.. COMMENT: All rights reserved.
+
Using Networking in an RTEMS Application
########################################
@@ -7,20 +12,20 @@ Makefile changes
Including the required managers
-------------------------------
-The FreeBSD networking code requires several RTEMS managers
-in the application:
-.. code:: c
+The FreeBSD networking code requires several RTEMS managers in the application:
+
+.. code-block:: c
MANAGERS = io event semaphore
Increasing the size of the heap
-------------------------------
-The networking tasks allocate a lot of memory. For most applications
-the heap should be at least 256 kbytes.
-The amount of memory set aside for the heap can be adjusted by setting
-the ``CFLAGS_LD`` definition as shown below:
-.. code:: c
+The networking tasks allocate a lot of memory. For most applications the heap
+should be at least 256 kbytes. The amount of memory set aside for the heap can
+be adjusted by setting the ``CFLAGS_LD`` definition as shown below:
+
+.. code-block:: c
CFLAGS_LD += -Wl,--defsym -Wl,HeapSize=0x80000
@@ -29,22 +34,20 @@ This sets aside 512 kbytes of memory for the heap.
System Configuration
====================
-The networking tasks allocate some RTEMS objects. These
-must be accounted for in the application configuration table. The following
-lists the requirements.
+The networking tasks allocate some RTEMS objects. These must be accounted for
+in the application configuration table. The following lists the requirements.
*TASKS*
One network task plus a receive and transmit task for each device.
*SEMAPHORES*
- One network semaphore plus one syslog mutex semaphore if the application uses
- openlog/syslog.
+ One network semaphore plus one syslog mutex semaphore if the application
+ uses openlog/syslog.
*EVENTS*
- The network stack uses ``RTEMS_EVENT_24`` and ``RTEMS_EVENT_25``.
- This has no effect on the application configuration, but
- application tasks which call the network functions should not
- use these events for other purposes.
+ The network stack uses ``RTEMS_EVENT_24`` and ``RTEMS_EVENT_25``. This has
+ no effect on the application configuration, but application tasks which
+ call the network functions should not use these events for other purposes.
Initialization
==============
@@ -52,92 +55,92 @@ Initialization
Additional include files
------------------------
-The source file which declares the network configuration
-structures and calls the network initialization function must include
-.. code:: c
+The source file which declares the network configuration structures and calls
+the network initialization function must include
+
+.. code-block:: c
#include <rtems/rtems_bsdnet.h>
Network Configuration
---------------------
-The network configuration is specified by declaring
-and initializing the ``rtems_bsdnet_config``
-structure.
-.. code:: c
+The network configuration is specified by declaring and initializing the
+``rtems_bsdnet_config`` structure.
+
+.. code-block:: c
struct rtems_bsdnet_config {
- /*
- * This entry points to the head of the ifconfig chain.
- \*/
- struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig \*ifconfig;
- /*
- * This entry should be rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp if BOOTP
- * is being used to configure the network, and NULL
- * if BOOTP is not being used.
- \*/
- void (\*bootp)(void);
- /*
- * The remaining items can be initialized to 0, in
- * which case the default value will be used.
- \*/
- rtems_task_priority network_task_priority; /* 100 \*/
- unsigned long mbuf_bytecount; /* 64 kbytes \*/
- unsigned long mbuf_cluster_bytecount; /* 128 kbytes \*/
- char \*hostname; /* BOOTP \*/
- char \*domainname; /* BOOTP \*/
- char \*gateway; /* BOOTP \*/
- char \*log_host; /* BOOTP \*/
- char \*name_server[3]; /* BOOTP \*/
- char \*ntp_server[3]; /* BOOTP \*/
- unsigned long sb_efficiency; /* 2 \*/
- /* UDP TX: 9216 bytes \*/
- unsigned long udp_tx_buf_size;
- /* UDP RX: 40 * (1024 + sizeof(struct sockaddr_in)) \*/
- unsigned long udp_rx_buf_size;
- /* TCP TX: 16 * 1024 bytes \*/
- unsigned long tcp_tx_buf_size;
- /* TCP TX: 16 * 1024 bytes \*/
- unsigned long tcp_rx_buf_size;
- /* Default Network Tasks CPU Affinity \*/
- #ifdef RTEMS_SMP
- const cpu_set_t \*network_task_cpuset;
- size_t network_task_cpuset_size;
- #endif
+ /*
+ * This entry points to the head of the ifconfig chain.
+ */
+ struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig *ifconfig;
+ /*
+ * This entry should be rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp if BOOTP
+ * is being used to configure the network, and NULL
+ * if BOOTP is not being used.
+ */
+ void (*bootp)(void);
+ /*
+ * The remaining items can be initialized to 0, in
+ * which case the default value will be used.
+ */
+ rtems_task_priority network_task_priority; /* 100 */
+ unsigned long mbuf_bytecount; /* 64 kbytes */
+ unsigned long mbuf_cluster_bytecount; /* 128 kbytes */
+ char *hostname; /* BOOTP */
+ char *domainname; /* BOOTP */
+ char *gateway; /* BOOTP */
+ char *log_host; /* BOOTP */
+ char *name_server[3]; /* BOOTP */
+ char *ntp_server[3]; /* BOOTP */
+ unsigned long sb_efficiency; /* 2 */
+ /* UDP TX: 9216 bytes */
+ unsigned long udp_tx_buf_size;
+ /* UDP RX: 40 * (1024 + sizeof(struct sockaddr_in)) */
+ unsigned long udp_rx_buf_size;
+ /* TCP TX: 16 * 1024 bytes */
+ unsigned long tcp_tx_buf_size;
+ /* TCP TX: 16 * 1024 bytes */
+ unsigned long tcp_rx_buf_size;
+ /* Default Network Tasks CPU Affinity */
+ #ifdef RTEMS_SMP
+ const cpu_set_t *network_task_cpuset;
+ size_t network_task_cpuset_size;
+ #endif
};
-The structure entries are described in the following table.
-If your application uses BOOTP/DHCP to obtain network configuration
-information and if you are happy with the default values described
-below, you need to provide only the first two entries in this structure.
-
-``struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig \*ifconfig``
-
- A pointer to the first configuration structure of the first network
- device. This structure is described in the following section.
- You must provide a value for this entry since there is no default value for it.
-
-``void (\*bootp)(void)``
-
- This entry should be set to ``rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp`` if your
- application by default uses the BOOTP/DHCP client protocol to obtain
- network configuration information. It should be set to ``NULL`` if
- your application does not use BOOTP/DHCP.
- You can also use ``rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp_rootfs`` to have a set of
- standard files created with the information return by the BOOTP/DHCP
- protocol. The IP address is added to :file:`/etc/hosts` with the host
- name and domain returned. If no host name or domain is returned``me.mydomain`` is used. The BOOTP/DHCP server's address is also
- added to :file:`/etc/hosts`. The domain name server listed in the
- BOOTP/DHCP information are added to :file:`/etc/resolv.conf`. A``search`` record is also added if a domain is returned. The files
- are created if they do not exist.
- The default ``rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp`` and``rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp_rootfs`` handlers will loop for-ever
- waiting for a BOOTP/DHCP server to respond. If an error is detected
- such as not valid interface or valid hardware address the target will
- reboot allowing any hardware reset to correct itself.
- You can provide your own custom handler which allows you to perform
- an initialization that meets your specific system requirements. For
- example you could try BOOTP/DHCP then enter a configuration tool if no
- server is found allowing the user to switch to a static configuration.
+The structure entries are described in the following table. If your
+application uses BOOTP/DHCP to obtain network configuration information and if
+you are happy with the default values described below, you need to provide only
+the first two entries in this structure.
+
+``struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig *ifconfig``
+ A pointer to the first configuration structure of the first network device.
+ This structure is described in the following section. You must provide a
+ value for this entry since there is no default value for it.
+
+``void (*bootp)(void)``
+ This entry should be set to ``rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp`` if your application
+ by default uses the BOOTP/DHCP client protocol to obtain network
+ configuration information. It should be set to ``NULL`` if your
+ application does not use BOOTP/DHCP. You can also use
+ ``rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp_rootfs`` to have a set of standard files created
+ with the information return by the BOOTP/DHCP protocol. The IP address is
+ added to :file:`/etc/hosts` with the host name and domain returned. If no
+ host name or domain is returned ``me.mydomain`` is used. The BOOTP/DHCP
+ server's address is also added to :file:`/etc/hosts`. The domain name
+ server listed in the BOOTP/DHCP information are added to
+ :file:`/etc/resolv.conf`. A``search`` record is also added if a domain is
+ returned. The files are created if they do not exist. The default
+ ``rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp`` and ``rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp_rootfs`` handlers
+ will loop for-ever waiting for a BOOTP/DHCP server to respond. If an error
+ is detected such as not valid interface or valid hardware address the
+ target will reboot allowing any hardware reset to correct itself. You can
+ provide your own custom handler which allows you to perform an
+ initialization that meets your specific system requirements. For example
+ you could try BOOTP/DHCP then enter a configuration tool if no server is
+ found allowing the user to switch to a static configuration.
``int network_task_priority``
The priority at which the network task and network device
@@ -152,95 +155,88 @@ below, you need to provide only the first two entries in this structure.
The number of bytes to allocate from the heap for use as mbuf clusters.
If a value of 0 is specified, 128 kbytes will be allocated.
-``char \*hostname``
+``char *hostname``
The host name of the system.
If this, or any of the following, entries are ``NULL`` the value
may be obtained from a BOOTP/DHCP server.
-``char \*domainname``
+``char *domainname``
The name of the Internet domain to which the system belongs.
-``char \*gateway``
- The Internet host number of the network gateway machine,
- specified in 'dotted decimal' (``129.128.4.1``) form.
+``char *gateway``
+ The Internet host number of the network gateway machine, specified in
+ 'dotted decimal' (``129.128.4.1``) form.
-``char \*log_host``
- The Internet host number of the machine to which ``syslog`` messages
- will be sent.
+``char *log_host``
+ The Internet host number of the machine to which ``syslog`` messages will
+ be sent.
-``char \*name_server[3]``
- The Internet host numbers of up to three machines to be used as
- Internet Domain Name Servers.
+``char *name_server[3]``
+ The Internet host numbers of up to three machines to be used as Internet
+ Domain Name Servers.
-``char \*ntp_server[3]``
+``char *ntp_server[3]``
The Internet host numbers of up to three machines to be used as
Network Time Protocol (NTP) Servers.
``unsigned long sb_efficiency``
- This is the first of five configuration parameters related to
- the amount of memory each socket may consume for buffers. The
- TCP/IP stack reserves buffers (e.g. mbufs) for each open socket. The
- TCP/IP stack has different limits for the transmit and receive
- buffers associated with each TCP and UDP socket. By tuning these
- parameters, the application developer can make trade-offs between
- memory consumption and performance. The default parameters favor
- performance over memory consumption. Seehttp://www.rtems.org/ml/rtems-users/2004/february/msg00200.html
- for more details but note that after the RTEMS 4.8 release series,
- the sb_efficiency default was changed from ``8`` to ``2``.
- The user should also be aware of the ``SO_SNDBUF`` and ``SO_RCVBUF``
- IO control operations. These can be used to specify the
- send and receive buffer sizes for a specific socket. There
- is no standard IO control to change the ``sb_efficiency`` factor.
- The ``sb_efficiency`` parameter is a buffering factor used
- in the implementation of the TCP/IP stack. The default is ``2``
- which indicates double buffering. When allocating memory for each
+ This is the first of five configuration parameters related to the amount of
+ memory each socket may consume for buffers. The TCP/IP stack reserves
+ buffers (e.g. mbufs) for each open socket. The TCP/IP stack has different
+ limits for the transmit and receive buffers associated with each TCP and
+ UDP socket. By tuning these parameters, the application developer can make
+ trade-offs between memory consumption and performance. The default
+ parameters favor performance over memory consumption. See
+ http://www.rtems.org/ml/rtems-users/2004/february/msg00200.html for more
+ details but note that after the RTEMS 4.8 release series, the
+ ``sb_efficiency`` default was changed from ``8`` to ``2``. The user should
+ also be aware of the ``SO_SNDBUF`` and ``SO_RCVBUF`` IO control operations.
+ These can be used to specify the send and receive buffer sizes for a
+ specific socket. There is no standard IO control to change the
+ ``sb_efficiency`` factor. The ``sb_efficiency`` parameter is a buffering
+ factor used in the implementation of the TCP/IP stack. The default is
+ ``2`` which indicates double buffering. When allocating memory for each
socket, this number is multiplied by the buffer sizes for that socket.
``unsigned long udp_tx_buf_size``
-
- This configuration parameter specifies the maximum amount of
- buffer memory which may be used for UDP sockets to transmit
- with. The default size is 9216 bytes which corresponds to
- the maximum datagram size.
+ This configuration parameter specifies the maximum amount of buffer memory
+ which may be used for UDP sockets to transmit with. The default size is
+ 9216 bytes which corresponds to the maximum datagram size.
``unsigned long udp_rx_buf_size``
+ This configuration parameter specifies the maximum amount of buffer memory
+ which may be used for UDP sockets to receive into. The default size is the
+ following length in bytes:
- This configuration parameter specifies the maximum amount of
- buffer memory which may be used for UDP sockets to receive
- into. The default size is the following length in bytes:
-
- .. code:: c
+ .. code-block:: c
40 * (1024 + sizeof(struct sockaddr_in)
``unsigned long tcp_tx_buf_size``
-
- This configuration parameter specifies the maximum amount of
- buffer memory which may be used for TCP sockets to transmit
- with. The default size is sixteen kilobytes.
+ This configuration parameter specifies the maximum amount of buffer memory
+ which may be used for TCP sockets to transmit with. The default size is
+ sixteen kilobytes.
``unsigned long tcp_rx_buf_size``
+ This configuration parameter specifies the maximum amount of buffer memory
+ which may be used for TCP sockets to receive into. The default size is
+ sixteen kilobytes.
- This configuration parameter specifies the maximum amount of
- buffer memory which may be used for TCP sockets to receive
- into. The default size is sixteen kilobytes.
-
-``const cpu_set_t \*network_task_cpuset``
-
- This configuration parameter specifies the CPU affinity of the
- network task. If set to ``0`` the network task can be scheduled on
- any CPU. Only available in SMP configurations.
+``const cpu_set_t *network_task_cpuset``
+ This configuration parameter specifies the CPU affinity of the network
+ task. If set to ``0`` the network task can be scheduled on any CPU. Only
+ available in SMP configurations.
``size_t network_task_cpuset_size``
+ This configuration parameter specifies the size of the
+ ``network_task_cpuset`` used. Only available in SMP configurations.
- This configuration parameter specifies the size of the``network_task_cpuset`` used. Only available in SMP configurations.
-
-In addition, the following fields in the ``rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig``
-are of interest.
+In addition, the following fields in the ``rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig`` are of
+interest.
*int port*
- The I/O port number (ex: 0x240) on which the external Ethernet
- can be accessed.
+ The I/O port number (ex: 0x240) on which the external Ethernet can be
+ accessed.
*int irno*
The interrupt number of the external Ethernet controller.
@@ -251,133 +247,125 @@ are of interest.
Network device configuration
----------------------------
-Network devices are specified and configured by declaring and initializing a``struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig`` structure for each network device.
+Network devices are specified and configured by declaring and initializing a
+``struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig`` structure for each network device.
The structure entries are described in the following table. An application
which uses a single network interface, gets network configuration information
-from a BOOTP/DHCP server, and uses the default values for all driver
-parameters needs to initialize only the first two entries in the
-structure.
-
-``char \*name``
- The full name of the network device. This name consists of the
- driver name and the unit number (e.g. ``"scc1"``).
- The ``bsp.h`` include file usually defines RTEMS_BSP_NETWORK_DRIVER_NAME as
- the name of the primary (or only) network driver.
-
-``int (\*attach)(struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig \*conf)``
- The address of the driver ``attach`` function. The network
- initialization function calls this function to configure the driver and
- attach it to the network stack.
- The ``bsp.h`` include file usually defines RTEMS_BSP_NETWORK_DRIVER_ATTACH as
- the name of the attach function of the primary (or only) network driver.
-
-``struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig \*next``
- A pointer to the network device configuration structure for the next network
- interface, or ``NULL`` if this is the configuration structure of the
- last network interface.
-
-``char \*ip_address``
- The Internet address of the device,
- specified in 'dotted decimal' (``129.128.4.2``) form, or ``NULL``
- if the device configuration information is being obtained from a
- BOOTP/DHCP server.
-
-``char \*ip_netmask``
- The Internet inetwork mask of the device,
- specified in 'dotted decimal' (``255.255.255.0``) form, or ``NULL``
- if the device configuration information is being obtained from a
- BOOTP/DHCP server.
-
-``void \*hardware_address``
- The hardware address of the device, or ``NULL`` if the driver is
- to obtain the hardware address in some other way (usually by reading
- it from the device or from the bootstrap ROM).
+from a BOOTP/DHCP server, and uses the default values for all driver parameters
+needs to initialize only the first two entries in the structure.
+
+``char *name``
+ The full name of the network device. This name consists of the driver name
+ and the unit number (e.g. ``"scc1"``). The ``bsp.h`` include file usually
+ defines ``RTEMS_BSP_NETWORK_DRIVER_NAME`` as the name of the primary (or
+ only) network driver.
+
+``int (*attach)(struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig *conf)``
+
+ The address of the driver ``attach`` function. The network initialization
+ function calls this function to configure the driver and attach it to the
+ network stack. The ``bsp.h`` include file usually defines
+ ``RTEMS_BSP_NETWORK_DRIVER_ATTACH`` as the name of the attach function of
+ the primary (or only) network driver.
+
+``struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig *next``
+ A pointer to the network device configuration structure for the next
+ network interface, or ``NULL`` if this is the configuration structure of
+ the last network interface.
+
+``char *ip_address``
+ The Internet address of the device, specified in 'dotted decimal'
+ (``129.128.4.2``) form, or ``NULL`` if the device configuration information
+ is being obtained from a BOOTP/DHCP server.
+
+``char *ip_netmask``
+ The Internet inetwork mask of the device, specified in 'dotted decimal'
+ (``255.255.255.0``) form, or ``NULL`` if the device configuration
+ information is being obtained from a BOOTP/DHCP server.
+
+``void *hardware_address``
+ The hardware address of the device, or ``NULL`` if the driver is to obtain
+ the hardware address in some other way (usually by reading it from the
+ device or from the bootstrap ROM).
``int ignore_broadcast``
Zero if the device is to accept broadcast packets, non-zero if the device
is to ignore broadcast packets.
``int mtu``
- The maximum transmission unit of the device, or zero if the driver
- is to choose a default value (typically 1500 for Ethernet devices).
+ The maximum transmission unit of the device, or zero if the driver is to
+ choose a default value (typically 1500 for Ethernet devices).
``int rbuf_count``
- The number of receive buffers to use, or zero if the driver is to
- choose a default value
+ The number of receive buffers to use, or zero if the driver is to choose a
+ default value
``int xbuf_count``
- The number of transmit buffers to use, or zero if the driver is to
- choose a default value
- Keep in mind that some network devices may use 4 or more
+ The number of transmit buffers to use, or zero if the driver is to choose a
+ default value Keep in mind that some network devices may use 4 or more
transmit descriptors for a single transmit buffer.
A complete network configuration specification can be as simple as the one
-shown in the following example.
-This configuration uses a single network interface, gets
-network configuration information
-from a BOOTP/DHCP server, and uses the default values for all driver
-parameters.
-.. code:: c
+shown in the following example. This configuration uses a single network
+interface, gets network configuration information from a BOOTP/DHCP server, and
+uses the default values for all driver parameters.
+
+.. code-block:: c
static struct rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig netdriver_config = {
- RTEMS_BSP_NETWORK_DRIVER_NAME,
- RTEMS_BSP_NETWORK_DRIVER_ATTACH
+ RTEMS_BSP_NETWORK_DRIVER_NAME,
+ RTEMS_BSP_NETWORK_DRIVER_ATTACH
};
struct rtems_bsdnet_config rtems_bsdnet_config = {
- &netdriver_config,
- rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp,
+ &netdriver_config,
+ rtems_bsdnet_do_bootp,
};
Network initialization
----------------------
-The networking tasks must be started before any network I/O operations
-can be performed. This is done by calling:
+The networking tasks must be started before any network I/O operations can be
+performed. This is done by calling:
-.. code:: c
+.. code-block:: c
rtems_bsdnet_initialize_network ();
-This function is declared in ``rtems/rtems_bsdnet.h``.
-t returns 0 on success and -1 on failure with an error code
-in ``errno``. It is not possible to undo the effects of
-a partial initialization, though, so the function can be
-called only once irregardless of the return code. Consequently,
-if the condition for the failure can be corrected, the
-system must be reset to permit another network initialization
-attempt.
+This function is declared in ``rtems/rtems_bsdnet.h``. t returns 0 on success
+and -1 on failure with an error code in ``errno``. It is not possible to undo
+the effects of a partial initialization, though, so the function can be called
+only once irregardless of the return code. Consequently, if the condition for
+the failure can be corrected, the system must be reset to permit another
+network initialization attempt.
Application Programming Interface
=================================
The RTEMS network package provides almost a complete set of BSD network
-services. The network functions work like their BSD counterparts
-with the following exceptions:
+services. The network functions work like their BSD counterparts with the
+following exceptions:
- A given socket can be read or written by only one task at a time.
-- The ``select`` function only works for file descriptors associated
- with sockets.
+- The ``select`` function only works for file descriptors associated with
+ sockets.
- You must call ``openlog`` before calling any of the ``syslog`` functions.
-- *Some of the network functions are not thread-safe.*
- For example the following functions return a pointer to a static
- buffer which remains valid only until the next call:
+- *Some of the network functions are not thread-safe.* For example the
+ following functions return a pointer to a static buffer which remains valid
+ only until the next call:
``gethostbyaddr``
-
``gethostbyname``
-
``inet_ntoa``
-
(``inet_ntop`` is thread-safe, though).
- The RTEMS network package gathers statistics.
-- Addition of a mechanism to "tap onto" an interface
- and monitor every packet received and transmitted.
+- Addition of a mechanism to "tap onto" an interface and monitor every packet
+ received and transmitted.
- Addition of ``SO_SNDWAKEUP`` and ``SO_RCVWAKEUP`` socket options.
@@ -387,9 +375,8 @@ sections.
Network Statistics
------------------
-There are a number of functions to print statistics gathered by
-the network stack.
-These function are declared in ``rtems/rtems_bsdnet.h``.
+There are a number of functions to print statistics gathered by the network
+stack. These function are declared in ``rtems/rtems_bsdnet.h``.
``rtems_bsdnet_show_if_stats``
Display statistics gathered by network interfaces.
@@ -415,442 +402,451 @@ These function are declared in ``rtems/rtems_bsdnet.h``.
Tapping Into an Interface
-------------------------
-RTEMS add two new ioctls to the BSD networking code:
-SIOCSIFTAP and SIOCGIFTAP. These may be used to set and get a*tap function*. The tap function will be called for every
-Ethernet packet received by the interface.
+RTEMS add two new ioctls to the BSD networking code, ``SIOCSIFTAP`` and
+``SIOCGIFTAP``. These may be used to set and get a *tap function*. The tap
+function will be called for every Ethernet packet received by the interface.
-These are called like other interface ioctls, such as SIOCSIFADDR.
-When setting the tap function with SIOCSIFTAP, set the ifr_tap field
-of the ifreq struct to the tap function. When retrieving the tap
-function with SIOCGIFTAP, the current tap function will be returned in
-the ifr_tap field. To stop tapping packets, call SIOCSIFTAP with a
-ifr_tap field of 0.
+These are called like other interface ioctls, such as ``SIOCSIFADDR``. When
+setting the tap function with ``SIOCSIFTAP``, set the ifr_tap field of the
+ifreq struct to the tap function. When retrieving the tap function with
+``SIOCGIFTAP``, the current tap function will be returned in the ifr_tap field.
+To stop tapping packets, call ``SIOCSIFTAP`` with a ``ifr_tap`` field of ``0``.
The tap function is called like this:
-.. code:: c
- int tap (struct ifnet \*, struct ether_header \*, struct mbuf \*)
+.. code-block:: c
-The tap function should return 1 if the packet was fully handled, in
-which case the caller will simply discard the mbuf. The tap function
-should return 0 if the packet should be passed up to the higher
-networking layers.
+ int tap (struct ifnet *, struct ether_header *, struct mbuf *)
-The tap function is called with the network semaphore locked. It must
-not make any calls on the application levels of the networking level
-itself. It is safe to call other non-networking RTEMS functions.
+The tap function should return ``1`` if the packet was fully handled, in which
+case the caller will simply discard the mbuf. The tap function should return
+``0`` if the packet should be passed up to the higher networking layers.
+
+The tap function is called with the network semaphore locked. It must not make
+any calls on the application levels of the networking level itself. It is safe
+to call other non-networking RTEMS functions.
Socket Options
--------------
-RTEMS adds two new ``SOL_SOCKET`` level options for ``setsockopt`` and``getsockopt``: ``SO_SNDWAKEUP`` and ``SO_RCVWAKEUP``. For both, the
-option value should point to a sockwakeup structure. The sockwakeup
-structure has the following fields:
-.. code:: c
+RTEMS adds two new ``SOL_SOCKET`` level options for ``setsockopt`` and
+``getsockopt``: ``SO_SNDWAKEUP`` and ``SO_RCVWAKEUP``. For both, the option
+value should point to a sockwakeup structure. The sockwakeup structure has the
+following fields:
+
+.. code-block:: c
- void (\*sw_pfn) (struct socket \*, caddr_t);
+ void (*sw_pfn) (struct socket *, caddr_t);
caddr_t sw_arg;
These options are used to set a callback function to be called when, for
-example, there is
-data available from the socket (``SO_RCVWAKEUP``) and when there is space
-available to accept data written to the socket (``SO_SNDWAKEUP``).
-
-If ``setsockopt`` is called with the ``SO_RCVWAKEUP`` option, and the``sw_pfn`` field is not zero, then when there is data
-available to be read from
-the socket, the function pointed to by the ``sw_pfn`` field will be
-called. A pointer to the socket structure will be passed as the first
-argument to the function. The ``sw_arg`` field set by the``SO_RCVWAKEUP`` call will be passed as the second argument to the function.
-
-If ``setsockopt`` is called with the ``SO_SNDWAKEUP``
-function, and the ``sw_pfn`` field is not zero, then when
-there is space available to accept data written to the socket,
-the function pointed to by the ``sw_pfn`` field
-will be called. The arguments passed to the function will be as with``SO_SNDWAKEUP``.
-
-When the function is called, the network semaphore will be locked and
-the callback function runs in the context of the networking task.
-The function must be careful not to call any networking functions. It
-is OK to call an RTEMS function; for example, it is OK to send an
-RTEMS event.
+example, there is data available from the socket (``SO_RCVWAKEUP``) and when
+there is space available to accept data written to the socket
+(``SO_SNDWAKEUP``).
+
+If ``setsockopt`` is called with the ``SO_RCVWAKEUP`` option, and the
+``sw_pfn`` field is not zero, then when there is data available to be read from
+the socket, the function pointed to by the ``sw_pfn`` field will be called. A
+pointer to the socket structure will be passed as the first argument to the
+function. The ``sw_arg`` field set by the ``SO_RCVWAKEUP`` call will be passed
+as the second argument to the function.
+
+If ``setsockopt`` is called with the ``SO_SNDWAKEUP`` function, and the
+``sw_pfn`` field is not zero, then when there is space available to accept data
+written to the socket, the function pointed to by the ``sw_pfn`` field will be
+called. The arguments passed to the function will be as with ``SO_SNDWAKEUP``.
+
+When the function is called, the network semaphore will be locked and the
+callback function runs in the context of the networking task. The function
+must be careful not to call any networking functions. It is OK to call an
+RTEMS function; for example, it is OK to send an RTEMS event.
The purpose of these callback functions is to permit a more efficient
-alternative to the select call when dealing with a large number of
-sockets.
-
-The callbacks are called by the same criteria that the select
-function uses for indicating "ready" sockets. In Stevens *Unix
-Network Programming* on page 153-154 in the section "Under what Conditions
-Is a Descriptor Ready?" you will find the definitive list of conditions
-for readable and writable that also determine when the functions are
-called.
-
-When the number of received bytes equals or exceeds the socket receive
-buffer "low water mark" (default 1 byte) you get a readable callback. If
-there are 100 bytes in the receive buffer and you only read 1, you will
-not immediately get another callback. However, you will get another
-callback after you read the remaining 99 bytes and at least 1 more byte
-arrives. Using a non-blocking socket you should probably read until it
-produces error EWOULDBLOCK and then allow the readable callback to tell
-you when more data has arrived. (Condition 1.a.)
-
-For sending, when the socket is connected and the free space becomes at
-or above the "low water mark" for the send buffer (default 4096 bytes)
-you will receive a writable callback. You don't get continuous callbacks
-if you don't write anything. Using a non-blocking write socket, you can
-then call write until it returns a value less than the amount of data
-requested to be sent or it produces error EWOULDBLOCK (indicating buffer
-full and no longer writable). When this happens you can
-try the write again, but it is often better to go do other things and
-let the writable callback tell you when space is available to send
-again. You only get a writable callback when the free space transitions
-to above the "low water mark" and not every time you
-write to a non-full send buffer. (Condition 2.a.)
-
-The remaining conditions enumerated by Stevens handle the fact that
-sockets become readable and/or writable when connects, disconnects and
-errors occur, not just when data is received or sent. For example, when
-a server "listening" socket becomes readable it indicates that a client
-has connected and accept can be called without blocking, not that
-network data was received (Condition 1.c).
+alternative to the select call when dealing with a large number of sockets.
+
+The callbacks are called by the same criteria that the select function uses for
+indicating "ready" sockets. In Stevens *Unix Network Programming* on page
+153-154 in the section "Under what Conditions Is a Descriptor Ready?" you will
+find the definitive list of conditions for readable and writable that also
+determine when the functions are called.
+
+When the number of received bytes equals or exceeds the socket receive buffer
+"low water mark" (default 1 byte) you get a readable callback. If there are 100
+bytes in the receive buffer and you only read 1, you will not immediately get
+another callback. However, you will get another callback after you read the
+remaining 99 bytes and at least 1 more byte arrives. Using a non-blocking
+socket you should probably read until it produces error ``EWOULDBLOCK`` and
+then allow the readable callback to tell you when more data has arrived.
+(Condition 1.a.)
+
+For sending, when the socket is connected and the free space becomes at or
+above the "low water mark" for the send buffer (default 4096 bytes) you will
+receive a writable callback. You don't get continuous callbacks if you don't
+write anything. Using a non-blocking write socket, you can then call write
+until it returns a value less than the amount of data requested to be sent or
+it produces error ``EWOULDBLOCK`` (indicating buffer full and no longer
+writable). When this happens you can try the write again, but it is often
+better to go do other things and let the writable callback tell you when space
+is available to send again. You only get a writable callback when the free
+space transitions to above the "low water mark" and not every time you write to
+a non-full send buffer. (Condition 2.a.)
+
+The remaining conditions enumerated by Stevens handle the fact that sockets
+become readable and/or writable when connects, disconnects and errors occur,
+not just when data is received or sent. For example, when a server "listening"
+socket becomes readable it indicates that a client has connected and accept can
+be called without blocking, not that network data was received (Condition 1.c).
Adding an IP Alias
------------------
The following code snippet adds an IP alias:
-.. code:: c
- void addAlias(const char \*pName, const char \*pAddr, const char \*pMask)
+.. code-block:: c
+
+ void addAlias(const char *pName, const char *pAddr, const char *pMask)
{
- struct ifaliasreq aliasreq;
- struct sockaddr_in \*in;
- /* initialize alias request \*/
- memset(&aliasreq, 0, sizeof(aliasreq));
- sprintf(aliasreq.ifra_name, pName);
- /* initialize alias address \*/
- in = (struct sockaddr_in \*)&aliasreq.ifra_addr;
- in->sin_family = AF_INET;
- in->sin_len = sizeof(aliasreq.ifra_addr);
- in->sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(pAddr);
- /* initialize alias mask \*/
- in = (struct sockaddr_in \*)&aliasreq.ifra_mask;
- in->sin_family = AF_INET;
- in->sin_len = sizeof(aliasreq.ifra_mask);
- in->sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(pMask);
- /* call to setup the alias \*/
- rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(pName, SIOCAIFADDR, &aliasreq);
+ struct ifaliasreq aliasreq;
+ struct sockaddr_in *in;
+
+ /* initialize alias request */
+ memset(&aliasreq, 0, sizeof(aliasreq));
+ sprintf(aliasreq.ifra_name, pName);
+
+ /* initialize alias address */
+ in = (struct sockaddr_in *)&aliasreq.ifra_addr;
+ in->sin_family = AF_INET;
+ in->sin_len = sizeof(aliasreq.ifra_addr);
+ in->sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(pAddr);
+
+ /* initialize alias mask */
+ in = (struct sockaddr_in *)&aliasreq.ifra_mask;
+ in->sin_family = AF_INET;
+ in->sin_len = sizeof(aliasreq.ifra_mask);
+ in->sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(pMask);
+
+ /* call to setup the alias */
+ rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(pName, SIOCAIFADDR, &aliasreq);
}
-Thanks to `Mike Seirs <mailto:mikes@poliac.com>`_ for this example
-code.
+Thanks to Mike Seirs <mailto:mikes@poliac.com> for this example code.
Adding a Default Route
----------------------
-The function provided in this section is functionally equivalent to
-the command ``route add default gw yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy``:
-.. code:: c
+The function provided in this section is functionally equivalent to the command
+``route add default gw yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy``:
- void mon_ifconfig(int argc, char \*argv[], unsigned32 command_arg,
- bool verbose)
+.. code-block:: c
+
+ void mon_ifconfig(int argc, char *argv[], unsigned32 command_arg, bool verbose)
{
- struct sockaddr_in ipaddr;
- struct sockaddr_in dstaddr;
- struct sockaddr_in netmask;
- struct sockaddr_in broadcast;
- char \*iface;
- int f_ip = 0;
- int f_ptp = 0;
- int f_netmask = 0;
- int f_up = 0;
- int f_down = 0;
- int f_bcast = 0;
- int cur_idx;
- int rc;
- int flags;
- bzero((void*) &ipaddr, sizeof(ipaddr));
- bzero((void*) &dstaddr, sizeof(dstaddr));
- bzero((void*) &netmask, sizeof(netmask));
- bzero((void*) &broadcast, sizeof(broadcast));
- ipaddr.sin_len = sizeof(ipaddr);
- ipaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
- dstaddr.sin_len = sizeof(dstaddr);
- dstaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
- netmask.sin_len = sizeof(netmask);
- netmask.sin_family = AF_INET;
- broadcast.sin_len = sizeof(broadcast);
- broadcast.sin_family = AF_INET;
- cur_idx = 0;
- if (argc <= 1) {
- /* display all interfaces \*/
- iface = NULL;
- cur_idx += 1;
- } else {
- iface = argv[1];
- if (isdigit(\*argv[2])) {
- if (inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[2], &ipaddr.sin_addr) < 0) {
- printf("bad ip address: %s\\n", argv[2]);
- return;
- }
- f_ip = 1;
- cur_idx += 3;
- } else {
- cur_idx += 2;
- }
- }
- if ((f_down !=0) && (f_ip != 0)) {
- f_up = 1;
- }
- while(argc > cur_idx) {
- if (strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "up") == 0) {
- f_up = 1;
- if (f_down != 0) {
- printf("Can't make interface up and down\\n");
- }
- } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "down") == 0) {
- f_down = 1;
- if (f_up != 0) {
- printf("Can't make interface up and down\\n");
- }
- } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "netmask") == 0) {
- if ((cur_idx + 1) >= argc) {
- printf("No netmask address\\n");
- return;
- }
- if (inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx+1], &netmask.sin_addr) < 0) {
- printf("bad netmask: %s\\n", argv[cur_idx]);
- return;
- }
- f_netmask = 1;
- cur_idx += 1;
- } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "broadcast") == 0) {
- if ((cur_idx + 1) >= argc) {
- printf("No broadcast address\\n");
- return;
- }
- if (inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx+1], &broadcast.sin_addr) < 0) {
- printf("bad broadcast: %s\\n", argv[cur_idx]);
- return;
- }
- f_bcast = 1;
- cur_idx += 1;
- } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "pointopoint") == 0) {
- if ((cur_idx + 1) >= argc) {
- printf("No pointopoint address\\n");
- return;
- }
- if (inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx+1], &dstaddr.sin_addr) < 0) {
- printf("bad pointopoint: %s\\n", argv[cur_idx]);
- return;
- }
- f_ptp = 1;
- cur_idx += 1;
- } else {
- printf("Bad parameter: %s\\n", argv[cur_idx]);
- return;
- }
- cur_idx += 1;
- }
- printf("ifconfig ");
- if (iface != NULL) {
- printf("%s ", iface);
- if (f_ip != 0) {
- char str[256];
- inet_ntop(AF_INET, &ipaddr.sin_addr, str, 256);
- printf("%s ", str);
- }
- if (f_netmask != 0) {
- char str[256];
- inet_ntop(AF_INET, &netmask.sin_addr, str, 256);
- printf("netmask %s ", str);
- }
- if (f_bcast != 0) {
- char str[256];
- inet_ntop(AF_INET, &broadcast.sin_addr, str, 256);
- printf("broadcast %s ", str);
- }
- if (f_ptp != 0) {
- char str[256];
- inet_ntop(AF_INET, &dstaddr.sin_addr, str, 256);
- printf("pointopoint %s ", str);
- }
- if (f_up != 0) {
- printf("up\\n");
- } else if (f_down != 0) {
- printf("down\\n");
- } else {
- printf("\\n");
- }
- }
- if ((iface == NULL) \|| ((f_ip == 0) && (f_down == 0) && (f_up == 0))) {
- rtems_bsdnet_show_if_stats();
- return;
- }
- flags = 0;
- if (f_netmask) {
- rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFNETMASK, &netmask);
- if (rc < 0) {
- printf("Could not set netmask: %s\\n", strerror(errno));
- return;
- }
- }
- if (f_bcast) {
- rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFBRDADDR, &broadcast);
- if (rc < 0) {
- printf("Could not set broadcast: %s\\n", strerror(errno));
- return;
- }
- }
- if (f_ptp) {
- rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFDSTADDR, &dstaddr);
- if (rc < 0) {
- printf("Could not set destination address: %s\\n", strerror(errno));
- return;
- }
- flags \|= IFF_POINTOPOINT;
- }
- /* This must come _after_ setting the netmask, broadcast addresses \*/
- if (f_ip) {
- rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFADDR, &ipaddr);
- if (rc < 0) {
- printf("Could not set IP address: %s\\n", strerror(errno));
- return;
- }
- }
- if (f_up != 0) {
- flags \|= IFF_UP;
- }
- if (f_down != 0) {
- printf("Warning: taking interfaces down is not supported\\n");
- }
- rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFFLAGS, &flags);
- if (rc < 0) {
- printf("Could not set interface flags: %s\\n", strerror(errno));
- return;
- }
- }
- void mon_route(int argc, char \*argv[], unsigned32 command_arg,
- bool verbose)
+ struct sockaddr_in ipaddr;
+ struct sockaddr_in dstaddr;
+ struct sockaddr_in netmask;
+ struct sockaddr_in broadcast;
+ char *iface;
+ int f_ip = 0;
+ int f_ptp = 0;
+ int f_netmask = 0;
+ int f_up = 0;
+ int f_down = 0;
+ int f_bcast = 0;
+ int cur_idx;
+ int rc;
+ int flags;
+
+ bzero((void*) &ipaddr, sizeof(ipaddr));
+ bzero((void*) &dstaddr, sizeof(dstaddr));
+ bzero((void*) &netmask, sizeof(netmask));
+ bzero((void*) &broadcast, sizeof(broadcast));
+ ipaddr.sin_len = sizeof(ipaddr);
+ ipaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
+ dstaddr.sin_len = sizeof(dstaddr);
+ dstaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
+ netmask.sin_len = sizeof(netmask);
+ netmask.sin_family = AF_INET;
+ broadcast.sin_len = sizeof(broadcast);
+ broadcast.sin_family = AF_INET;
+ cur_idx = 0;
+
+ if (argc <= 1) {
+ /* display all interfaces */
+ iface = NULL;
+ cur_idx += 1;
+ } else {
+ iface = argv[1];
+ if (isdigit(*argv[2])) {
+ if (inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[2], &ipaddr.sin_addr) < 0) {
+ printf("bad ip address: %s\n", argv[2]);
+ return;
+ }
+ f_ip = 1;
+ cur_idx += 3;
+ } else {
+ cur_idx += 2;
+ }
+ }
+
+ if ((f_down !=0) && (f_ip != 0)) {
+ f_up = 1;
+ }
+
+ while(argc > cur_idx) {
+ if (strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "up") == 0) {
+ f_up = 1;
+ if (f_down != 0) {
+ printf("Can't make interface up and down\n");
+ }
+ } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "down") == 0) {
+ f_down = 1;
+ if (f_up != 0) {
+ printf("Can't make interface up and down\n");
+ }
+ } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "netmask") == 0) {
+ if ((cur_idx + 1) >= argc) {
+ printf("No netmask address\n");
+ return;
+ }
+ if (inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx+1], &netmask.sin_addr) < 0) {
+ printf("bad netmask: %s\n", argv[cur_idx]);
+ return;
+ }
+ f_netmask = 1;
+ cur_idx += 1;
+ } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "broadcast") == 0) {
+ if ((cur_idx + 1) >= argc) {
+ printf("No broadcast address\n");
+ return;
+ }
+ if (inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx+1], &broadcast.sin_addr) < 0) {
+ printf("bad broadcast: %s\n", argv[cur_idx]);
+ return;
+ }
+ f_bcast = 1;
+ cur_idx += 1;
+ } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "pointopoint") == 0) {
+ if ((cur_idx + 1) >= argc) {
+ printf("No pointopoint address\n");
+ return;
+ }
+ if (inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx+1], &dstaddr.sin_addr) < 0) {
+ printf("bad pointopoint: %s\n", argv[cur_idx]);
+ return;
+ }
+ f_ptp = 1;
+ cur_idx += 1;
+ } else {
+ printf("Bad parameter: %s\n", argv[cur_idx]);
+ return;
+ }
+ cur_idx += 1;
+ }
+
+ printf("ifconfig ");
+
+ if (iface != NULL) {
+ printf("%s ", iface);
+ if (f_ip != 0) {
+ char str[256];
+ inet_ntop(AF_INET, &ipaddr.sin_addr, str, 256);
+ printf("%s ", str);
+ }
+ if (f_netmask != 0) {
+ char str[256];
+ inet_ntop(AF_INET, &netmask.sin_addr, str, 256);
+ printf("netmask %s ", str);
+ }
+ if (f_bcast != 0) {
+ char str[256];
+ inet_ntop(AF_INET, &broadcast.sin_addr, str, 256);
+ printf("broadcast %s ", str);
+ }
+ if (f_ptp != 0) {
+ char str[256];
+ inet_ntop(AF_INET, &dstaddr.sin_addr, str, 256);
+ printf("pointopoint %s ", str);
+ }
+ if (f_up != 0) {
+ printf("up\n");
+ } else if (f_down != 0) {
+ printf("down\n");
+ } else {
+ printf("\n");
+ }
+ }
+
+ if ((iface == NULL) || ((f_ip == 0) && (f_down == 0) && (f_up == 0))) {
+ rtems_bsdnet_show_if_stats();
+ return;
+ }
+
+ flags = 0;
+ if (f_netmask) {
+ rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFNETMASK, &netmask);
+ if (rc < 0) {
+ printf("Could not set netmask: %s\n", strerror(errno));
+ return;
+ }
+ }
+ if (f_bcast) {
+ rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFBRDADDR, &broadcast);
+ if (rc < 0) {
+ printf("Could not set broadcast: %s\n", strerror(errno));
+ return;
+ }
+ }
+ if (f_ptp) {
+ rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFDSTADDR, &dstaddr);
+ if (rc < 0) {
+ printf("Could not set destination address: %s\n", strerror(errno));
+ return;
+ }
+ flags |= IFF_POINTOPOINT;
+ }
+
+ /* This must come _after_ setting the netmask, broadcast addresses */
+ if (f_ip) {
+ rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFADDR, &ipaddr);
+ if (rc < 0) {
+ printf("Could not set IP address: %s\n", strerror(errno));
+ return;
+ }
+ }
+ if (f_up != 0) {
+ flags |= IFF_UP;
+ }
+ if (f_down != 0) {
+ printf("Warning: taking interfaces down is not supported\n");
+ }
+
+ rc = rtems_bsdnet_ifconfig(iface, SIOCSIFFLAGS, &flags);
+ if (rc < 0) {
+ printf("Could not set interface flags: %s\n", strerror(errno));
+ return;
+ }
+ }
+
+ void mon_route(int argc, char *argv[], unsigned32 command_arg, bool verbose)
{
- int cmd;
- struct sockaddr_in dst;
- struct sockaddr_in gw;
- struct sockaddr_in netmask;
- int f_host;
- int f_gw = 0;
- int cur_idx;
- int flags;
- int rc;
- memset(&dst, 0, sizeof(dst));
- memset(&gw, 0, sizeof(gw));
- memset(&netmask, 0, sizeof(netmask));
- dst.sin_len = sizeof(dst);
- dst.sin_family = AF_INET;
- dst.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("0.0.0.0");
- gw.sin_len = sizeof(gw);
- gw.sin_family = AF_INET;
- gw.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("0.0.0.0");
- netmask.sin_len = sizeof(netmask);
- netmask.sin_family = AF_INET;
- netmask.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("255.255.255.0");
- if (argc < 2) {
- rtems_bsdnet_show_inet_routes();
- return;
- }
- if (strcmp(argv[1], "add") == 0) {
- cmd = RTM_ADD;
- } else if (strcmp(argv[1], "del") == 0) {
- cmd = RTM_DELETE;
- } else {
- printf("invalid command: %s\\n", argv[1]);
- printf("\\tit should be 'add' or 'del'\\n");
- return;
- }
- if (argc < 3) {
- printf("not enough arguments\\n");
- return;
- }
- if (strcmp(argv[2], "-host") == 0) {
- f_host = 1;
- } else if (strcmp(argv[2], "-net") == 0) {
- f_host = 0;
- } else {
- printf("Invalid type: %s\\n", argv[1]);
- printf("\\tit should be '-host' or '-net'\\n");
- return;
- }
- if (argc < 4) {
- printf("not enough arguments\\n");
- return;
- }
- inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[3], &dst.sin_addr);
- cur_idx = 4;
- while(cur_idx < argc) {
- if (strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "gw") == 0) {
- if ((cur_idx +1) >= argc) {
- printf("no gateway address\\n");
- return;
- }
- f_gw = 1;
- inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx + 1], &gw.sin_addr);
- cur_idx += 1;
- } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "netmask") == 0) {
- if ((cur_idx +1) >= argc) {
- printf("no netmask address\\n");
- return;
- }
- f_gw = 1;
- inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx + 1], &netmask.sin_addr);
- cur_idx += 1;
- } else {
- printf("Unknown argument\\n");
- return;
- }
- cur_idx += 1;
- }
- flags = RTF_STATIC;
- if (f_gw != 0) {
- flags \|= RTF_GATEWAY;
- }
- if (f_host != 0) {
- flags \|= RTF_HOST;
- }
- rc = rtems_bsdnet_rtrequest(cmd, &dst, &gw, &netmask, flags, NULL);
- if (rc < 0) {
- printf("Error adding route\\n");
- }
- }
-
-Thanks to `Jay Monkman <mailto:jtm@smoothmsmoothie.com>`_ for this example
+ int cmd;
+ struct sockaddr_in dst;
+ struct sockaddr_in gw;
+ struct sockaddr_in netmask;
+ int f_host;
+ int f_gw = 0;
+ int cur_idx;
+ int flags;
+ int rc;
+
+ memset(&dst, 0, sizeof(dst));
+ memset(&gw, 0, sizeof(gw));
+ memset(&netmask, 0, sizeof(netmask));
+ dst.sin_len = sizeof(dst);
+ dst.sin_family = AF_INET;
+ dst.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("0.0.0.0");
+ gw.sin_len = sizeof(gw);
+ gw.sin_family = AF_INET;
+ gw.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("0.0.0.0");
+ netmask.sin_len = sizeof(netmask);
+ netmask.sin_family = AF_INET;
+ netmask.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("255.255.255.0");
+
+ if (argc < 2) {
+ rtems_bsdnet_show_inet_routes();
+ return;
+ }
+
+ if (strcmp(argv[1], "add") == 0) {
+ cmd = RTM_ADD;
+ } else if (strcmp(argv[1], "del") == 0) {
+ cmd = RTM_DELETE;
+ } else {
+ printf("invalid command: %s\n", argv[1]);
+ printf("\tit should be 'add' or 'del'\n");
+ return;
+ }
+
+ if (argc < 3) {
+ printf("not enough arguments\n");
+ return;
+ }
+
+ if (strcmp(argv[2], "-host") == 0) {
+ f_host = 1;
+ } else if (strcmp(argv[2], "-net") == 0) {
+ f_host = 0;
+ } else {
+ printf("Invalid type: %s\n", argv[1]);
+ printf("\tit should be '-host' or '-net'\n");
+ return;
+ }
+
+ if (argc < 4) {
+ printf("not enough arguments\n");
+ return;
+ }
+
+ inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[3], &dst.sin_addr);
+
+ cur_idx = 4;
+ while(cur_idx < argc) {
+ if (strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "gw") == 0) {
+ if ((cur_idx +1) >= argc) {
+ printf("no gateway address\n");
+ return;
+ }
+ f_gw = 1;
+ inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx + 1], &gw.sin_addr);
+ cur_idx += 1;
+ } else if(strcmp(argv[cur_idx], "netmask") == 0) {
+ if ((cur_idx +1) >= argc) {
+ printf("no netmask address\n");
+ return;
+ }
+ f_gw = 1;
+ inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[cur_idx + 1], &netmask.sin_addr);
+ cur_idx += 1;
+ } else {
+ printf("Unknown argument\n");
+ return;
+ }
+ cur_idx += 1;
+ }
+
+ flags = RTF_STATIC;
+ if (f_gw != 0) {
+ flags |= RTF_GATEWAY;
+ }
+ if (f_host != 0) {
+ flags |= RTF_HOST;
+ }
+
+ rc = rtems_bsdnet_rtrequest(cmd, &dst, &gw, &netmask, flags, NULL);
+ if (rc < 0) {
+ printf("Error adding route\n");
+ }
+ }
+
+Thanks to Jay Monkman <mailto:jtm@smoothmsmoothie.com> for this example
code.
Time Synchronization Using NTP
------------------------------
-.. code:: c
+.. code-block:: c
int rtems_bsdnet_synchronize_ntp (int interval, rtems_task_priority priority);
-If the interval argument is 0 the routine synchronizes the RTEMS time-of-day
-clock with the first NTP server in the rtems_bsdnet_ntpserve array and
-returns. The priority argument is ignored.
+If the interval argument is ``0`` the routine synchronizes the RTEMS
+time-of-day clock with the first NTP server in the ``rtems_bsdnet_ntpserve``
+array and returns. The priority argument is ignored.
-If the interval argument is greater than 0, the routine also starts an
-RTEMS task at the specified priority and polls the NTP server every
-'interval' seconds. NOTE: This mode of operation has not yet been
-implemented.
+If the interval argument is greater than 0, the routine also starts an RTEMS
+task at the specified priority and polls the NTP server every 'interval'
+seconds. NOTE: This mode of operation has not yet been implemented.
On successful synchronization of the RTEMS time-of-day clock the routine
-returns 0. If an error occurs a message is printed and the routine returns -1
-with an error code in errno.
-There is no timeout - if there is no response from an NTP server the
-routine will wait forever.
-
-.. COMMENT: Written by Eric Norum
-
-.. COMMENT: COPYRIGHT (c) 1988-2002.
-
-.. COMMENT: On-Line Applications Research Corporation (OAR).
-
-.. COMMENT: All rights reserved.
-
+returns ``0``. If an error occurs a message is printed and the routine returns
+``-1`` with an error code in errno. There is no timeout - if there is no
+response from an NTP server the routine will wait forever.